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Wild Music in the News

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Updated: 56 min 18 sec ago

Predicting the predator threatening a squirrel by analyzing its sounds and tail movements

4 hours 28 min ago
Biologists found the could quite accurately predict what type of predator was threatening a squirrel by analyzing its sounds and tail movements.

Screening questions fail to identify teens at risk for hearing loss

4 hours 31 min ago
Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers. Their study results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions.

Google's streaming music service adds mood to mix

4 hours 48 min ago
Google's music-subscription service will try to anticipate its listeners' mood swings as it amplifies its competition with Pandora, Spotify and other popular services that play tunes over the Internet.

Fishy vegetable production methods explained through aquaponics

7 hours 38 min ago
If growing vegetables in a box with no soil and out of direct sunlight sounds a little fishy, well, it is.

New radio telescope ready to probe

9 hours 48 min ago
Whirring back and forth on a turning turret, the white, 40-foot dish evokes the aura of movies such as "Golden Eye" or "Contact," but the University of Arizona team of scientists and engineers that commissioned it earlier this month isn't planning to listen for signals from extraterrestrials or hijack satellites.

Unconventional experimental design

October 20, 2014 - 10:00pm
(University of Miami) Over two years of observation McRae, working closely with professor of biology Steven Green, found that he could quite accurately predict what type of predator was threatening a squirrel by analyzing its sounds and tail movements.

Scientists restore hearing in noise-deafened mice, pointing way to new therapies

October 20, 2014 - 7:23pm
Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. By demonstrating the importance of the protein, called NT3, in maintaining communication between the ears and brain, these new findings pave the way for research in humans that could improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise exposure and normal aging.

Another month, another global heat record broken

October 20, 2014 - 11:53am
WASHINGTON (AP) -- It sounds like a broken record: Last month again set a new mark for global heat. And meteorologists say Earth is now on pace to tie the hottest year ever recorded, or more likely, to break it....

Secrets of dinosaur ecology found in fragile amber

October 20, 2014 - 11:39am
Ryan McKellar’s research sounds like it was plucked from Jurassic Park: he studies pieces of amber found buried with dinosaur skeletons. But rather than re-creating dinosaurs, he uses the tiny pieces of fossilized tree resin to study the world in which the now-extinct behemoths lived. New techniques for investigating very tiny pieces of fragile amber buried in dinosaur bonebeds could close the gaps in knowledge about the ecology of the dinosaurs.

Secrets of dinosaur ecology found in fragile amber

October 20, 2014 - 10:24am
Ryan McKellar's research sounds like it was plucked from Jurassic Park: he studies pieces of amber found buried with dinosaur skeletons. But rather than re-creating dinosaurs, McKellar uses the tiny pieces of fossilized tree resin to study the world in which the now-extinct behemoths lived.

An android opera: Japan's Shibuya plots new era of robot music

October 20, 2014 - 10:10am
Life and death, surveillance and privacy, humans and robots: Keiichiro Shibuya likes to unsettle and push boundaries in music.

Digital native fallacy: Teachers still know better when it comes to using technology

October 20, 2014 - 9:57am
Members of today's younger Net Generation aren't more tech savvy than their teachers just because they were born into a world full of computers. In fact, if it weren't for the coaxing and support of their educators, many students would never use their electronic devices for more than playing games or listening to music. So says Shiang-Kwei Wang of the New York Institute of Technology in the US, who led a study on how middle school science teachers and their students use technology inside and outside the classroom. The findings appear in the journal Educational Technology Research & Development.

Digital native fallacy: Teachers still know better when it comes to using technology

October 20, 2014 - 8:49am
A new study looks at how teachers and students use technology inside and outside the classroom. It turns out that members of today's younger Net Generation aren't more tech savvy than their teachers just because they were born into a world full of computers. In fact, if it weren't for the coaxing and support of their educators, many students would never use their electronic devices for more than playing games or listening to music, say experts.

Offshore 4.2 Magnitude Quake Shakes North Coast

October 19, 2014 - 10:30pm

CBS San Francisco Connect With Us At KPIX 5 PROGRAM GUIDE: KPIX 5 TV Schedule WATCH: A Glimpse Inside The Working KPIX 5 Newsroom Breaking News Send news tips, video & photos, and video to the KPIX 5 [...] CONNECT WITH KCBS Welcome to KCBS All News 740AM & 106.9FM on CBSSanFrancisco.com! LIKE KCBS Radio On Facebook: KCBS is the Bay Area's only all news station, serving listeners with local, national and world news around the clock, [...] EUREKA - An offshore earthquake with a magnitude of 4.2 shook the California North Coast region near Fortuna early Sunday morning, the U.S. Geological Survey reported. The temblor struck about 24 miles south-southwest of Fortuna at 7:24 a.m. at a depth of about 14 miles, according to the USGS.

Scientists restore hearing in noise-deafened mice, pointing way to new therapies

October 19, 2014 - 10:00pm
(University of Michigan Health System) Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. By demonstrating the importance of the protein, called NT3, in maintaining communication between the ears and brain, these new findings pave the way for research in humans that could improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise exposure and normal aging.

Secrets of dinosaur ecology found in fragile amber

October 19, 2014 - 10:00pm
(Geological Society of America) Ryan McKellar's research sounds like it was plucked from Jurassic Park: he studies pieces of amber found buried with dinosaur skeletons. But rather than re-creating dinosaurs, McKellar uses the tiny pieces of fossilized tree resin to study the world in which the now-extinct behemoths lived.

Most Interesting Science News Articles of the Week

October 19, 2014 - 3:11pm
Explaining bizarre lake sounds, discovering new particles and exploring an ancient sundial — just a few of the coolest stories in Science this week.

Kickstarter project – KEECKER – rolling robot entertainment center

October 17, 2014 - 7:00am
A new project on Kickstarter has gotten a lot of attention, it's the KEECKER, billed as The World's First HomePod, a rolling egg-looking robot that moves from room to room in a person's house, bringing personal entertainment functionality with it. The idea is that instead of having music players, television sets, etc. in multiple rooms, have just one that can be summoned to wherever you want.

Twitter tweets start to sing

October 17, 2014 - 12:04am
Twitter began letting people instantly listen to music and other audio by clicking on tweets from the popular messaging service.

Myelin vital for learning new practical skills

October 16, 2014 - 12:37pm
New evidence of myelin's essential role in learning and retaining new practical skills, such as playing a musical instrument, has been uncovered by research. Myelin is a fatty substance produced by the brain and spinal cord into early adulthood as it is needed for many developmental processes, and although earlier studies of human white matter hinted at its involvement in skill learning, this is the first time it has been confirmed experimentally.