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Wild Music in the News

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Updated: 21 min 54 sec ago

Google's Play Music creates playlist based on user's mood

21 min 54 sec ago

Need some music for Monday morning? Google's Play Music can create a playlist suited for commuting or getting the work week started.  

Warning coloration paved the way for louder, more complex calls in certain species of poisonous frogs

October 24, 2014 - 4:36pm
Frogs are well-known for being among the loudest amphibians, but new research indicates that the development of this trait followed another: bright coloration. Scientists have found that the telltale colors of some poisonous frog species established them as an unappetizing option for would-be predators before the frogs evolved their elaborate songs. As a result, these initial warning signals allowed different species to diversify their calls over time.

Music therapy reduces depression in children, adolescents

October 23, 2014 - 7:18am
Music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents with behavioral and emotional problems, a study has found.

Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy

October 22, 2014 - 12:36pm
A new study provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development.

Successful read/write of digital data in fused silica glass with high recording density

October 22, 2014 - 6:56am
Hitachi today announced that, in collaboration with Professor MIURA Kiyotaka of the School of Engineering, Kyoto University, it has successfully achieved read/write of digital data in 100 layers of fused silica glass, a recording density comparable to Blu-ray Disc. One hundred multi-layer data recording was verified by the application of newly developed noise reduction technology to overcome interference from data recorded on other layers while trying to access data written in deeper layers within the fused silica glass.

New robotic telescope revolutionizes the study of stars

October 22, 2014 - 5:00am
In the last 8 months a fully robotic telescope in Tenerife has been carrying out high-precision observations of the motion of stellar surfaces. The telescope is the first in the SONG telescope network and a milestone in a new global stellar research project, aiming at making it possible to follow the stars twenty-four seven.

Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy

October 21, 2014 - 10:00pm
(University of North Carolina Health Care) A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development.

Predicting the predator threatening a squirrel by analyzing its sounds and tail movements

October 21, 2014 - 10:59am
Biologists found the could quite accurately predict what type of predator was threatening a squirrel by analyzing its sounds and tail movements.

Screening questions fail to identify teens at risk for hearing loss

October 21, 2014 - 10:56am
Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers. Their study results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions.

Google's streaming music service adds mood to mix

October 21, 2014 - 10:40am
Google's music-subscription service will try to anticipate its listeners' mood swings as it amplifies its competition with Pandora, Spotify and other popular services that play tunes over the Internet.

Fishy vegetable production methods explained through aquaponics

October 21, 2014 - 7:50am
If growing vegetables in a box with no soil and out of direct sunlight sounds a little fishy, well, it is.

New radio telescope ready to probe

October 21, 2014 - 5:40am
Whirring back and forth on a turning turret, the white, 40-foot dish evokes the aura of movies such as "Golden Eye" or "Contact," but the University of Arizona team of scientists and engineers that commissioned it earlier this month isn't planning to listen for signals from extraterrestrials or hijack satellites.

Unconventional experimental design

October 20, 2014 - 10:00pm
(University of Miami) Over two years of observation McRae, working closely with professor of biology Steven Green, found that he could quite accurately predict what type of predator was threatening a squirrel by analyzing its sounds and tail movements.

Scientists restore hearing in noise-deafened mice, pointing way to new therapies

October 20, 2014 - 7:23pm
Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. By demonstrating the importance of the protein, called NT3, in maintaining communication between the ears and brain, these new findings pave the way for research in humans that could improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise exposure and normal aging.

Another month, another global heat record broken

October 20, 2014 - 11:53am
WASHINGTON (AP) -- It sounds like a broken record: Last month again set a new mark for global heat. And meteorologists say Earth is now on pace to tie the hottest year ever recorded, or more likely, to break it....

Secrets of dinosaur ecology found in fragile amber

October 20, 2014 - 11:39am
Ryan McKellar’s research sounds like it was plucked from Jurassic Park: he studies pieces of amber found buried with dinosaur skeletons. But rather than re-creating dinosaurs, he uses the tiny pieces of fossilized tree resin to study the world in which the now-extinct behemoths lived. New techniques for investigating very tiny pieces of fragile amber buried in dinosaur bonebeds could close the gaps in knowledge about the ecology of the dinosaurs.

Secrets of dinosaur ecology found in fragile amber

October 20, 2014 - 10:24am
Ryan McKellar's research sounds like it was plucked from Jurassic Park: he studies pieces of amber found buried with dinosaur skeletons. But rather than re-creating dinosaurs, McKellar uses the tiny pieces of fossilized tree resin to study the world in which the now-extinct behemoths lived.

An android opera: Japan's Shibuya plots new era of robot music

October 20, 2014 - 10:10am
Life and death, surveillance and privacy, humans and robots: Keiichiro Shibuya likes to unsettle and push boundaries in music.

Digital native fallacy: Teachers still know better when it comes to using technology

October 20, 2014 - 9:57am
Members of today's younger Net Generation aren't more tech savvy than their teachers just because they were born into a world full of computers. In fact, if it weren't for the coaxing and support of their educators, many students would never use their electronic devices for more than playing games or listening to music. So says Shiang-Kwei Wang of the New York Institute of Technology in the US, who led a study on how middle school science teachers and their students use technology inside and outside the classroom. The findings appear in the journal Educational Technology Research & Development.

Digital native fallacy: Teachers still know better when it comes to using technology

October 20, 2014 - 8:49am
A new study looks at how teachers and students use technology inside and outside the classroom. It turns out that members of today's younger Net Generation aren't more tech savvy than their teachers just because they were born into a world full of computers. In fact, if it weren't for the coaxing and support of their educators, many students would never use their electronic devices for more than playing games or listening to music, say experts.