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Updated: 25 min 53 sec ago

New tool to probe cancer's molecular make-up

August 26, 2014 - 6:58am
Scientists have shown how to better identify and measure vital molecules that control cell behavior – paving the way for improved tools for diagnosis, prediction and monitoring of cancer. The study's leader said: “Protein kinases regulate how cells communicate. When these molecules are deregulated it corresponds to cells “hearing voices” with a resulting change in their behavior. Doctors need a way to spot changes in kinase levels in individual tumors so they can see how they respond to treatments and match patients to the treatment that works best for them.” 

Hearings planned after call for nuke plant closure

August 25, 2014 - 6:02pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- A U.S. Senate committee is planning hearings on earthquake risks at California's last operating nuclear power plant....

Hypersonic weapon detonated after lift-off: US military

August 25, 2014 - 9:14am
The US military had to detonate a hypersonic weapon seconds after lift-off Monday due to a technical problem, cutting short a flight test for the experimental project, officials said.

Quantum meets classical: Qubit fabricated with integrated micromagnet increases speed of quantum manipulation in silicon

August 25, 2014 - 7:30am
(Phys.org) —The ubiquitous classical digital computer encodes data in bits (a portmanteau of binary and digits) in either a 0 or 1 state. On the other hand, while a quantum computer also uses 0/1 data representation, these qubits (from quantum and bits), qubit states 0 and 1 can be simultaneously in what is known as a superposition – and a quantum computer can also make use of entanglement. For these reasons, quantum computers can potentially solve problems whose complexity is too resource-intensive for classical computation. That being said, quantum computers are very difficult to construct. Recently, however, scientists at University of Wisconsin, Madison have fabricated a qubit in a silicon double-quantum dot in which the qubit basis states are the singlet state and the spin-zero triplet state of two electrons. (A double quantum dot links two quantum dots – semiconductor nanostructures that confine the motion of conduction band electrons, valence band holes, or excitons in all three spatial directions.) Moreover, the researchers have for the first time integrated a proximal micromagnet, allowing them to create a large local magnetic field difference between the two sides of the quantum dot - thereby greatly increasing their ability to manipulate the qubit without injecting noise that would induce superposition decoherence.

Finally, an Algorithm to Sort Your Beatles Albums

August 22, 2014 - 8:00am
By analyzing the evolving structure of the Beatles’ music, the computer program was able to correctly place the Fab Four’s albums in chronological order. Karen Hopkin reports

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Space Plane Tech Could Power Hypersonic Aircraft for US Military

August 21, 2014 - 6:19pm
The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory is studying hypersonic vehicles that would use the Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE), which is intended to power the Skylon space plane, AFRL officials said.

When it comes to how pizza looks, cheese matters

August 21, 2014 - 4:34pm
Most consumers have an idea what they want their pizza slice to look like. Golden cheese with that dark toasted-cheese color scattered in distinct blistery patches across the surface with a bit of oil glistening in the valleys. A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), evaluated the pizza baking performance of different cheeses (mozzarella, cheddar, colby, Edam, Emmental, Gruyere, and provolone) in conjunction with a new quantifiable evaluation technique to see how their composition and functional differences affected browning and blistering.

When it comes to how pizza looks, cheese matters

August 21, 2014 - 1:38pm
Most consumers have an idea what they want their pizza slice to look like. Golden cheese with that dark toasted-cheese color scattered in distinct blistery patches across the surface with a bit of oil glistening in the valleys. A new study evaluated the pizza baking performance of different cheeses (mozzarella, cheddar, colby, Edam, Emmental, Gruyere, and provolone) in conjunction with a new quantifiable evaluation technique to see how their composition and functional differences affected browning and blistering.

Music site SoundCloud to start paying artists

August 21, 2014 - 10:36am
SoundCloud said Thursday that it will start paying artists and record companies whose music is played on the popular streaming site, a move that will bring it in line with competitors such as YouTube and Spotify.

Shazam breaks 100 million monthly user mark

August 20, 2014 - 4:32pm
Shazam announced Wednesday that 100 million people use its song-recognition mobile service monthly in a 34 percent surge from a year earlier.

Songbird student pilots delay departure and make frequent stopovers during first migration

August 20, 2014 - 12:00pm
Juvenile songbirds on spring migration travel from overwintering sites in the tropics to breeding destinations thousands of kilometres away with no prior experience to guide them. Now, a new study out of York University has tracked these "student pilots" on their first long-haul flight and found significant differences between the timing of juvenile migration and that of experienced adults.

Jurassic mammals were picky eaters, new study finds

August 20, 2014 - 11:59am
New analyses of tiny fossil mammals from Glamorgan, South Wales are shedding light on the function and diets of our earliest ancestors, a team reports. Mammals and their immediate ancestors from the Jurassic period (201-145 million years ago) developed new characteristics - such as better hearing and teeth capable of precise chewing.

Scientists learn more about rare skin cancer that killed Bob Marley

August 20, 2014 - 10:32am
Acral melanomas, the rare type of skin cancer that caused musician Bob Marley’s death, are genetically distinct from other types of skin cancer. Acral melanoma most often affects the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, nail-beds and other hairless parts of the skin. Unlike other more common types of melanoma, it's not caused by UV damage from the sun.

Myo armband and smartglasses set for deskless workplace

August 20, 2014 - 10:00am
Thalmic Labs, Canada-based makers of the Myo armband, has announced the integration of Myo with smartglasses, with the partnership help of a number of companies pairing the Myo with their products. The gesture-control Myo armband fits around the forearm and provides control options. Thalmic Labs means serious business for Myo in on-the-job applications deploying wearables. Technicians, engineers and other workers who operate in deskless environments are the workers in focus. The idea is for Myo to be paired with smartglasses for touch-free, voice-free interactions in environments where users cannot or do not want to touch their glasses, or where noise or other factors make voice control less than ideal. Myo's gesture control is to be compatible with a range of smartglasses.

Ecstasy Law Does More Harm Than Good, One Researcher Argues

August 20, 2014 - 9:55am
The 2003 RAVE Act has made club promoters reluctant to take safety measures such as offering water or having medics at electronic music dance parties.

Neuron circuit may enable pitch perception applications

August 19, 2014 - 9:10am
The first FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron circuit designed to include noise and exhibit the Ghost Stochastic Resonance effect has been presented by researchers from Université de Bourgogne in France. Their circuit operates according to the exact expression of the nonlinearity required by the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of neural activity. This has allowed them to investigate the real-time effect of noise and confirm that a ghost frequency is present, a nonlinear signature that could be useful to develop pitch perception applications.

Disquieting times for Malaysia's 'fish listener'

August 19, 2014 - 1:30am
One hand clinging to his boat's gunwale, Harun Muhammad submerges himself, eyes and ears wide open underwater as he "listens" for fish sounds emanating from the blue depths.

Project serves up big data to guide managing America's coastal waters

August 18, 2014 - 11:51am
Researchers have given a sweeping assessment to understand how human activities are affecting estuaries, the nation's sounds, bays, gulfs and bayous. This first comprehensive look at changes in land cover, river flow, pollution and nutrient levels offers a comprehensive look at the state of America's estuaries.

Brad Paisley 'Tweets' With Space Station Astronaut At NASA Kennedy | Video

August 18, 2014 - 10:52am
The singer-songwriter tweeted with astronaut Reid Wiseman during a visit to the Space Center in Florida. He was there to promote his new song, "American Flag on the Moon".

Music to your ears? Evidence of damage to hearing from music

August 18, 2014 - 7:48am
Many people listen to loud music without realizing that this can affect their hearing. This could lead to difficulties in understanding speech during age-related hearing loss which affects up to half of people over the age of 65. New research has examined the cellular mechanisms that underlie hearing loss and tinnitus triggered by exposure to loud sound.