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Wild Music in the News

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Updated: 4 min 55 sec ago

Bristol researchers enhance the performance of Imogen Heap's musical gloves

July 3, 2014 - 4:30am
Wireless technology is becoming increasingly common in live musical performances but the technology is prone to interference, which can affect a live concert. A research team have demonstrated the potential Wi-Fi has to offer for live performances and specifically for the musical gloves used by the artist Imogen Heap.

People with Tinnitus May Process Emotions Differently

July 2, 2014 - 5:33pm
People with the mysterious hearing condition tinnitus may hear incessant ringing or whooshing noises, and may suffer depression or anxiety with their condition. Now a new study finds their brains may also process emotions differently.

Video: Why some people just don't like music

July 2, 2014 - 5:41am
For many people, enjoying music results in noticeable physical reactions – sweaty palms or a shiver down the spine. Music can cause the release of dopamine in your body, which provides a feeling of immense pleasure and reward.

Plants respond to leaf vibrations caused by insects' chewing

July 1, 2014 - 4:38pm
Previous studies have suggested that plant growth can be influenced by sound and that plants respond to wind and touch. Now, researchers, in a collaboration that brings together audio and chemical analysis, have determined that plants respond to the sounds that caterpillars make when eating plants and that the plants respond with more defenses.

Google buys Songza streaming music service

July 1, 2014 - 3:33pm
Google on Tuesday said that it has bought Songza, a free online streaming music service that recommends tunes based on what people might be in the mood to hear.

Plants respond to leaf vibrations caused by insects' chewing

July 1, 2014 - 3:09pm
Previous studies have suggested that plant growth can be influenced by sound and that plants respond to wind and touch. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri, in a collaboration that brings together audio and chemical analysis, have determined that plants respond to the sounds that caterpillars make when eating plants and that the plants respond with more defenses.

Traffic noise is dangerous for your health: Solutions exist for dense cities

July 1, 2014 - 6:53am
Traffic noise is the second biggest environmental problem in the EU, according to WHO. After air pollution, noise is affecting health the most. But legislation regarding noise pollution is insufficient. A new report shows how negative health effects of noise can be reduced. Several means are easiest to apply in dense cities.

New software brings the right wind farm to the right spot

July 1, 2014 - 6:20am
Wind farms are springing up all across Europe, covering some 8 % of the EU's electricity needs in 2013 according to the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA). But several drawbacks have so far prevented this share from growing as much as it could: most notably, citizens have complained about the noise, disturbances in telecommunications or the impact on ecosystems. But what if a single piece of software could solve all these problems?

Traffic noise solutions exist for dense cities

July 1, 2014 - 5:47am
Traffic noise is the second biggest environmental problem in the EU, according to WHO. After air pollution, noise is affecting health the most. But legislation regarding noise pollution is insufficient. A new report shows how negative health effects of noise can be reduced. Several means are easiest to apply in dense cities.

Simulations helps scientists understand and control turbulence in humans and machines

July 1, 2014 - 4:25am
Aerospace engineers from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign are using the National Science Foundation-supported Stampede supercomputer to explore how jets in general, like those on modern aircraft and inside the human body, generate noise.

Plants respond to leaf vibrations caused by insects' chewing, MU study finds

June 30, 2014 - 10:00pm
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Previous studies have suggested that plant growth can be influenced by sound and that plants respond to wind and touch. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri, in a collaboration that brings together audio and chemical analysis, have determined that plants respond to the sounds that caterpillars make when eating plants and that the plants respond with more defenses.

Why That Bass Beat Moves Us

June 30, 2014 - 1:02pm
Bass notes lay down beats in music worldwide, and new research may reveal why that is — the ear responds better to rhythms set by deeper sounds, scientists say.

NASA Mars test a success. Now to master the parachute

June 30, 2014 - 11:57am
Halfway to space in the skies above Hawaii, NASA successfully tested its Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator, a vehicle equipped with new technology for ferrying heavy payloads to Mars. A massive balloon lifted the saucer-shaped vehicle from a naval base in Kauai at 11:45 a.m. (Pacific) on...

Doctors urge caution with Fourth of July fireworks

June 30, 2014 - 9:34am
Nothing says “Fourth of July” like fireworks, but doctors at Vanderbilt University Medical Center urge caution with consumer fireworks and suggest leaving these displays to the experts. Vanderbilt doctors annually treat burns and eye injuries and even see patients with hearing loss due to fireworks usage.

Learn Dutch in your sleep: Listening to lessons while sleeping reinforces memory

June 30, 2014 - 7:36am
When you have learned words in another language, it may be worth listening to them again in your sleep. A study has now shown that this method reinforces memory. "Our method is easy to use in daily life and can be adopted by anyone," says the study director.

NASA's 'Flying Saucer' Test - Heat Shield Inflates and Parachute Fails | Video

June 30, 2014 - 7:32am
The Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) was tested over Hawaii on June 28th, 2014. It successfully tested the Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) but its second major test, the Supersonic Disk Sail Parachute, failed to deploy.

Successful test of saucer-shaped vehicle for future Mars missions

June 30, 2014 - 6:12am
NASA has successfully conducted the first of three planned tests for the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project, developed to evaluate new landing technologies for future Mars missions. While this initial test was designed to determine the flying ability of the vehicle, it also deployed two new landing technologies as a bonus. Those landing technologies will be officially tested in the next two flights, involving clones of the saucer-shaped vehicle.

First LDSD test flight a success

June 30, 2014 - 4:50am
NASA representatives participated in a media teleconference this morning to discuss the June 28, 2014 near-space test flight of the agency's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD), which occurred off the coast of the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii.

NASA's 'Flying Saucer' Test - Launch and Powered Flight | Video

June 29, 2014 - 7:48pm
The Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) was tested over Hawaii on June 28th, 2014. The vehicle, testing new Mars descent and landing tech, was dropped from a balloon at an altitude of 23 miles and fired its onboard rocket.

Rhythm is heard best in the bass

June 29, 2014 - 6:00pm
Better detection by the brain could explain why low-pitched notes carry the beat across musical cultures.