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Wild Music in the News

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Updated: 2 hours 46 min ago

Using sonar to navigate: Bats do it, dolphins do it, and now humans can do it, too

July 7, 2015 - 11:46am
Bats have been using sonar to navigate and communicate for ages, and now humans can do the same, thanks to lightweight and efficient ultrasound microphones and loudspeakers developed by physicists. The devices owe their flat frequency response to graphene, which makes a stiff and responsive diaphragm far superior to those in today's ultrasound receivers and transmitters. Biologists can even slap one on a bat to record its nightly ultrasonic conversations.

Decoding the brain: Scientists redefine and measure single-neuron signal-to-noise ratio

July 7, 2015 - 10:40am
(Phys.org)—The signal-to-noise ratio, or SNR, is a well-known metric typically expressed in decibels and defined as a measure of signal strength relative to background noise – and in statistical terms as the ratio of the squared amplitude or variance of a signal relative to the variance of the noise. However, this definition – while commonly used to measure fidelity in physical systems – is not applicable to neural systems, because neural spiking activity (in which electrical pulses called action potentials travel down nerve fiber as voltage spikes, the pattern of which encodes and transmits information) is more accurately represented using point processes (random collections of points, each representing the time and/or location of an event).

Oorganization of human brain is nearly ideal

July 7, 2015 - 10:01am
The structure of the human brain has an almost ideal network of connections -- the links that permit information to travel from, say, the auditory cortex (responsible for hearing) to the motor cortex (responsible for movement).

'Here comes the sun': Does pop music have a 'rhythm of the rain?'

July 7, 2015 - 6:25am
Weather is frequently portrayed in popular music, with a new scientific study finding over 750 popular music songs referring to weather, the most common being sun and rain, and blizzards being the least common.

Bloodhound Diary: November date for debut

July 7, 2015 - 5:34am
Measuring loads on a car that is travelling at supersonic speeds

Bats do it, dolphins do it -- now humans can do it, too

July 6, 2015 - 10:00pm
(University of California - Berkeley) Bats have been using sonar to navigate and communicate for ages, and now humans can do the same, thanks to lightweight and efficient ultrasound microphones and loudspeakers developed by UC Berkeley physicists. The devices owe their flat frequency response to graphene, which makes a stiff and responsive diaphragm far superior to those in today's ultrasound receivers and transmitters. Biologists can even slap one on a bat to record its nightly ultrasonic conversations.

Researchers find the organization of the human brain to be nearly ideal

July 6, 2015 - 10:00pm
(Northeastern University) The paper, pub­lished in the July 3 issue of Nature Com­mu­nica­tions, reveals that the struc­ture of the human brain has an almost ideal net­work of connections -- the links that permit infor­ma­tion to travel from, say, the audi­tory cortex (respon­sible for hearing) to the motor cortex (respon­sible for move­ment).

'Here comes the sun': Does pop music have a 'rhythm of the rain?'

July 6, 2015 - 5:00pm
Weather is frequently portrayed in popular music, with a new scientific study finding over 750 popular music songs referring to weather, the most common being sun and rain, and blizzards being the least common. The study also found many song writers were inspired by weather events.

Mean Machines: US & Japan Mega-Robots to Battle

July 6, 2015 - 3:30pm
If watching giant robots fight to the death sounds like your idea of a good time, then you're in luck.

Surfing a wake of light: Researchers observe and control light wakes for the first time

July 6, 2015 - 10:37am
When a duck paddles across a pond or a supersonic plane flies through the sky, it leaves a wake in its path. Wakes occur whenever something is traveling through a medium faster than the waves it creates—in the duck's case water waves, in the plane's case shock waves, otherwise known as sonic booms.

6.2-Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Off Tonga

July 6, 2015 - 9:25am

CBS San Francisco Connect With Us At KPIX 5 PROGRAM GUIDE: KPIX 5 TV Schedule WATCH: A Glimpse Inside The Working KPIX 5 Newsroom Breaking News Send news tips, video & photos, and video to the KPIX 5 [] CONNECT WITH KCBS Welcome to KCBS All News 740AM & 106.9FM on CBSSanFrancisco.com! LISTEN LIVE RIGHT NOW: KCBS Live Audio Stream LIKE KCBS Radio On Facebook: KCBS is the Bay Area's only all news station, serving [] TONGA - The U.S. Geological Survey says a strong earthquake has struck the Pacific nation of Tonga, but no tsunami threat was expected. The quake's epicenter was located 47 miles northeast of Ohonua, Tonga, and struck at a depth of 6.2 miles.

Strong reaction to oil sands mining plan in Utah

July 6, 2015 - 5:20am

The debate over an oil sands mining operations' impact to nearby perennial springs in eastern Utah continues to rage, a more than eight-years-long controversy that once again stoked protests and a hearing on Tuesday. At one point, the discussion over the proposed expansion of the PR Spring Project on the border of Uintah and Grand counties inspired heated remarks from a University of Utah geologist who conducted a hydrologic study in the area that he said shows water resources are vulnerable.

A day with Apple Music: What it is and what it isn't

July 4, 2015 - 5:00pm

Apple launched its streaming service on Tuesday. Here's a hands-on experience of a user's first day with Apple Music.

No Damage Reported From Fourth of July Magnitude 4.2 Quake In Oregon

July 4, 2015 - 4:08pm

CBS San Francisco Connect With Us At KPIX 5 PROGRAM GUIDE: KPIX 5 TV Schedule WATCH: A Glimpse Inside The Working KPIX 5 Newsroom Breaking News Send news tips, video & photos, and video to the KPIX 5 [...] CONNECT WITH KCBS Welcome to KCBS All News 740AM & 106.9FM on CBSSanFrancisco.com! LISTEN LIVE RIGHT NOW: KCBS Live Audio Stream LIKE KCBS Radio On Facebook: KCBS is the Bay Area's only all news station, serving [...] SPRINGFIELD, Ore. - Some Oregonians woke on the Fourth of July to a significant jolt when a magnitude 4.2 earthquake struck near Springfield and Eugene.

Why Do Small Birds Have Sweeter Songs?

July 4, 2015 - 7:03am
An anatomical difference in some birds produces sounds that are music to the human ear, experts say.

Facegloria: Facebook for Brazil's Evangelicals

July 4, 2015 - 1:30am
Fluffy clouds waft across a blue sky as you log in and while you chat with friends, Gospel music rings out: welcome to Facegloria, the social network for Brazilian Evangelicals.

Can NextRadio app help make radio relevant for a digital audience?

July 3, 2015 - 10:30am
After Apple Inc. announced a new music app that will use people to create real-time song playlists, HBO "Real Time" host Bill Maher joked that the company should be congratulated for "inventing radio."

Can Dogs Finally Keep It Together This 4th of July?

July 3, 2015 - 10:00am
Probably not. But the noise isn’t the whole problem.

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Encryption made easier: Just talk like a parent

July 3, 2015 - 5:19am
Encrypting emails can be tedious, difficult and very confusing. And even for those who have mastered the process, it's useless unless the intended recipient has the correct software to decode the message. A Georgia Institute of Technology researcher has created an easier method – one that sounds familiar to parents who try to outsmart their 8-year-old child. The new technique gets rid of the complicated, mathematically generated messages that are typical of encryption software. Instead, the method transforms specific emails into ones that are vague by leaving out key words.

Encryption made easier: Just talk like a parent

July 2, 2015 - 11:18am
A researcher has created an easier email encryption method – one that sounds familiar to parents who try to outsmart their 8-year-old child. The new technique gets rid of the complicated, mathematically generated messages that are typical of encryption software. Instead, the method transforms specific emails into ones that are vague by leaving out key words.