Go to content Go to navigation Go to search
A traveling exhibition about the sounds and songs of life

Wild Music in the News

Syndicate content
Pipes Output
Updated: 8 min 33 sec ago

Industry's thinnest battery connector corresponding to 6 ampere high current capacity

October 1, 2014 - 7:28am
Panasonic Corporation announced today that it has developed a battery connector to FPC (Flexible Printed Circuit) board corresponding to high current capacity and boasting the industry's thinnest thickness. It is useful in the connection of the battery to the electric circuit in smartphones, tablets, and other wearable devices using embedded batteries.

Using intelligence to unlock the market for electric vehicles

October 1, 2014 - 7:25am
Our fuel-based economy must be radically overhauled if Europe is to achieve its ambitious emission reduction targets. One important piece of this jigsaw could be the increased commercialisation of electric cars, which use carbon-free energy sources and emit no CO2 or other pollutants. As an added bonus, electric vehicles also create less noise and vibration.

Learning at 10 degrees north

October 1, 2014 - 7:15am
Secluded beaches, calypso music and the entertaining carnival are often what come to mind when thinking of the islands of Trinidad and Tobago. But Dal Earth Sciences students might first consider Trinidad's natural resources.

Researchers find first instance of fish larvae making sounds

October 1, 2014 - 5:30am
(Phys.org) —A trio of researchers with the University of Miami has recorded sounds made by fish larvae in both the open ocean and in their lab. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Erica Staaterman, Claire Paris and Andrew Kough describe how they captured the larvae sounds and offer ideas on why they are made.

New study first to document the voices of fish larvae

September 30, 2014 - 10:00pm
(University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science) A new study from researchers at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science is the first to document that fish larvae produce sound. These 'knock' and 'growl' sounds may help small larvae maintain group cohesion in the dark.

Improving babies' language skills before they're even old enough to speak

September 30, 2014 - 3:14pm
In the first months of life, when babies begin to distinguish sounds that make up language from all the other sounds in the world, they can be trained to more effectively recognize which sounds “might” be language, accelerating the development of the brain maps which are critical to language acquisition and processing, according to new research.

Higgs Music: What the World’s Largest Atom Smasher Sounds Like

September 30, 2014 - 12:31pm
The discovery of the Higgs boson, the particle thought to give all others their mass, was music to scientists' ears, but now the data has been turned into literal music.

Mathematical model tackles 'Game of Thrones' predictions

September 30, 2014 - 10:50am
Take events from the past, build a statistical model, and tell the future. Why not apply the formula to novels? Can contents in future books be predicted based only on data from existing ones? Richard Vale at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, said The Physics arXiv Blog, has taken on the challenge in predicting content of as yet unpublished novels in the "A Song of Ice and Fire" series by George R R Martin. The novels are the basis of the television series, "Game of Thrones." The series has five books and two more are awaited. Before proceeding, it should be emphasized that the paper comes with a spoiler alert, so avoid linking to Vale's study if you have not read the first five books.

Canada demands Google, Netflix data, sets deadline

September 30, 2014 - 1:40am
Canada's broadcast regulator on Monday gave American companies Google and Netflix a three-day deadline to turn over subscriber data or have their testimony expunged from a major public hearing, media reported.

Now hear this: Simple fluid waveguide performs spectral analysis in a manner similar to the cochlea

September 29, 2014 - 11:00am
(Phys.org) —Within the mammalian inner ear, or cochlea, a remarkable but and long-debated phenomenon occurs: As they move from the base of the cochlea to its apex, traveling fluid waves – that is, surface waves, in which (like waves on the sea and or in a canal) water moves both longitudinally and transversally – peak in amplitude at locations that depend on the wave's frequency. (Higher frequencies are concentrated in the base, lower frequencies in the apex.) What's critical is that these peaks allow us to identify and separate sounds. While cochlear frequency selectivity is typically explained by local resonances, this idea has two problems: resonance-based models require excessive intracochlear mass, and moreover cannot accurately represent the cochlea's production of both phase and amplitude information. Recently, however, Prof. Marcel van der Heijden at Erasmus Medical Center, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, has rejected resonance, and in its place has designed and fabricated a novel neural data-inspired approach to producing these frequency-dependent amplitude peaks in the form of a disarmingly simple waveguide that, in a manner analogous to an optical prism, carries fluid waves and performs spectral analysis. By incorporating a longitudinal gradient, the waveguide – which consists of two parallel fluid-filled chambers connected by a narrow slit spanned by two coupled elastic beams – separates frequencies and decelerates energy transport through wave dispersion, thereby focusing the peak-creating energy. Its novelty derives from its spectral analysis functionality being based not on resonance, nor on standing waves or geometric periodicity, but on mode shape swapping – an abrupt exchange of shapes between propagating wave modes – making it a new physical effect based on well-known physics.

Researchers solves Gold Coast light rail noise issues

September 29, 2014 - 4:00am
Lessons learned through Monash University research into the reduction of wheel squeal noise of trains in Hong Kong has assisted the GoldLinQ consortium to resolve noise problems with the new Gold Coast light rail (GCLR) passenger service.

Apple won't shut down Beats Music, but it will probably revamp it

September 23, 2014 - 5:16pm

Apple denies that it will shut down Beats Music. What will Apple do with the fledgling Beats Music streaming service?

Infant cooing, babbling linked to hearing ability, researcher finds

September 23, 2014 - 4:21pm
Infant vocalizations are primarily motivated by infants' ability to hear their own babbling, research shows. Additionally, infants with profound hearing loss who received cochlear implants to help correct their hearing soon reached the vocalization levels of their hearing peers, putting them on track for language development.

Dying brain cells cue new brain cells to grow in songbird

September 23, 2014 - 4:20pm
Using a songbird as a model, scientists have described a brain pathway that replaces cells that have been lost naturally and not because of injury. If scientists can further tap into the process, it might lead to ways to encourage replacement of cells in human brains that have lost neurons naturally because of aging or Alzheimer's disease.

PlayStation TV to hit US in October

September 23, 2014 - 12:56pm
PlayStation TV home entertainment system is set to hit North America on October 14 as Sony seeks to improve its financial footing with games, films and music.

551 Feet Under the Sea: What It’s Like to Ride in a Deep-Sea Sub

September 23, 2014 - 10:43am
I heard a screwing noise as the hatch of our sub was sealed. A bright orange hose from topside that had been inserted into the sub to blow fresh air as we loaded had been removed, and the interior...

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Campfire stories may have sparked early societal learning

September 23, 2014 - 8:30am
Don't underestimate the value of sitting around a campfire, listening to stories, singing songs and letting yourself stare mesmerized into the flickering flames. These activities may have played an essential role in early societies.

Smart meters could cause conflict for housemates

September 23, 2014 - 8:15am
Arguments about whose turn it is to do the washing up, negotiating rights to the TV remote control and disputes over noise -- as many students returning to university for the new academic year are about to learn the hard way, sharing a house can be a tricky business. And now research has revealed that new technology to allow people to monitor their energy usage in the home could be about to ratchet up the tension.

Smart meters could cause conflict for housemates, study shows

September 23, 2014 - 7:55am
Arguments about whose turn it is to do the washing up, negotiating rights to the TV remote control and disputes over noise—as many students returning to university for the new academic year are about to learn the hard way, sharing a house can be a tricky business.

Dying brain cells cue new brain cells to grow in songbird

September 22, 2014 - 10:00pm
(University of Washington) Using a songbird as a model, scientists have described a brain pathway that replaces cells that have been lost naturally and not because of injury. If scientists can further tap into the process and understand how those signals work, it might lead to ways to encourage replacement of cells in human brains that have lost neurons naturally because of aging or Alzheimer's disease.