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Updated: 51 weeks 4 days ago

Whistled Language Forces Brain to Modify Usual Processing

August 17, 2015 - 9:58am
Both hemispheres are involved in the brains of people interpreting a whistled variant of Turkish, compared with a left hemisphere dominance when listeners hear the spoken language  

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Futuristic electronics one step nearer

August 17, 2015 - 9:06am
When researchers dream about electronics of the future, they more or less dream of pouring liquids into a beaker, stirring them together and decanting a computer out onto the table. This field of research is known as self-assembling molecular electronics. But, getting chemical substances to self-assemble into electronic components is just as complicated as it sounds. The secret behind the breakthrough is... Soap.

Breakthrough brings futuristic electronics a step nearer

August 17, 2015 - 7:59am
When researchers dream about electronics of the future, they more or less dream of pouring liquids into a beaker, stirring them together and decanting a computer out onto the table. This field of research is known as self-assembling molecular electronics. But, getting chemical substances to self-assemble into electronic components is just as complicated as it sounds. Now, a group of researchers has published their breakthrough within the field. The group consists of first-year nanoscience students from the University of Copenhagen.

Quiet design: Hospital tests sound panels to reduce noise

August 17, 2015 - 7:33am
Monitors. Alarms. Pagers. People. Hospital noise can keep patients from getting a good night's sleep. Sound panels tested in the hallways of a hospital system helped reduce noise around patient rooms.

Birdsong recognition app launches

August 14, 2015 - 6:30am
QMUL machine learning researcher Dan Stowell and his business partner Florence Wilkinson have launched Warblr, their mobile app that can automatically recognise birds by their song.

Apes may be closer to speaking than many scientists think

August 14, 2015 - 1:55am
Koko the gorilla is best known for a lifelong study to teach her a silent form of communication, American Sign Language. But some of the simple sounds she has learned may change the perception that humans are the only primates with the capacity for speech.

Apes may be closer to speaking than many scientists think

August 13, 2015 - 3:12pm
Koko the gorilla is best known for a lifelong study to teach her a silent form of communication, American Sign Language. But some of the simple sounds she has learned may change the perception that humans are the only primates with the capacity for speech.

Helping Siri hear through a cocktail party

August 13, 2015 - 1:03pm
People trying to talk to Siri may soon no longer have to look like they're about to eat their iPhones, thanks to a new technology demonstration that solves the 'Cocktail Party' conundrum. The new approach uses metamaterials and compressive sensing to determine the direction of a sound and extract it from the surrounding background noise.

Astronomer creates music using star oscillations

August 13, 2015 - 6:50am
(Phys.org)—Astronomer Burak Ulaş, with the Izmir Turk College Planetarium in Turkey has taken his work into a musical dimension, using star oscillations as a source for a musical composition. He has uploaded a paper describing what he has done along with sheet music and an audio recording of his work to the preprint server arXiv—along with a shout-out to other pioneers in the field, from Kepler to Pythagoras to modern composer scientists Jenő Keuler and Zoltán Kolláth.

Human language may have started differently than thought

August 13, 2015 - 6:30am
(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers, two with the University of Wisconsin, the other with the University of California, has conducted a study, the results of which suggest that maybe humans did not get a start on language using only hand gestures as many scientists have theorized. Instead, as Marcus Perlman, Rick Dale and Gary Lupyan note in their paper published in Royal Society Open Science, it may have been a result of both noise-making and gesturing.

Astronaut Chris Hadfield Releasing 'Space Sessions' Album Recorded in Orbit

August 13, 2015 - 5:17am
In the first single off of Chris Hadfield's new music album, the first album to be primarily recorded in outer space, the astronaut sings "Can't stand on my own two feet, I just float away, I took a ride in a hot hot seat, now I'm ready to play, far away.

Songbirds make mysterious altitude changes during nighttime migratory flights

August 12, 2015 - 4:00pm
A new mystery has been discovered in the migratory behavior of birds! Many songbirds travel long distances during their annual migrations, and it makes sense for them to do everything they can to conserve their energy during these journeys. Researchers have guessed that, for this reason, they might pick an altitude with favorable winds and stick with it rather than climbing and descending repeatedly, but there has been little data to back this up.

Rdio enables saving of tracks from 500 live radio stations

August 12, 2015 - 1:40pm
Rdio, the music subscription service backed by Skype co-founder Janus Friis, is partnering to bring simulcasts of 500 traditional radio stations to its app in the U.S.

The man with the power to predict economic success

August 12, 2015 - 6:10am
There's a mild disappointment when you meet Shade Shutters and listen to him discuss his area of study.

3-D–Printed Device Helps Computers Solve Cocktail Party Problem

August 11, 2015 - 9:30am
Acoustic metamaterial can sort sounds according to their direction

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Penn study details 'rotten egg' gas' role in autoimmune disease

August 10, 2015 - 10:00pm
(University of Pennsylvania) A new study led by Songtao Shi of the University of Pennsylvania has demonstrated how regulatory T cells can themselves be regulated, by an unexpected source: hydrogen sulfide, a gas produced by the body's muscle cells and one often associated with the smell of rotten eggs.

All-purpose optical method for observing physical, chemical or biological processes at the nanoscale

August 10, 2015 - 8:40am
To gain even deeper insights into the smallest of worlds, the thresholds of microscopy must be expanded further. Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and the TU Dresden, in cooperation with the Freie Universität Berlin, have succeeded in combining two established measurement techniques for the first time: near-field optical microscopy and ultra-fast spectroscopy. Computer-assisted technology developed especially for this purpose combines the advantages of both methods and suppresses unwanted noise. This makes highly precise filming of dynamic processes at the nanometer scale possible. The results were recently published in the research journal Scientific Reports.

Camera for the nano-cosmos

August 10, 2015 - 7:17am
To gain even deeper insights into the smallest of worlds, the thresholds of microscopy must be expanded further. Scientists have succeeded in combining two established measurement techniques for the first time: near-field optical microscopy and ultra-fast spectroscopy. Computer-assisted technology developed especially for this purpose combines the advantages of both methods and suppresses unwanted noise. This makes highly precise filming of dynamic processes at the nanometer scale possible.

New design could finally help to bring fusion power closer to reality

August 10, 2015 - 5:11am
It's an old joke that many fusion scientists have grown tired of hearing: Practical nuclear fusion power plants are just 30 years away—and always will be.

Camera for the nano-cosmos

August 9, 2015 - 10:00pm
(Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf) To gain even deeper insights into the smallest of worlds, the thresholds of microscopy must be expanded further. Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the TU Dresden have succeeded in combining two established measurement techniques for the first time: near-field optical microscopy and ultra-fast spectroscopy. Computer-assisted technology developed especially for this purpose combines the advantages of both methods and suppresses unwanted noise. This makes highly precise filming of dynamic processes at the nanometer scale possible.