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Wild Music in the News

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Updated: 3 hours 11 min ago

New tool will measure impact of man-made noise on sea-mammals

July 2, 2015 - 5:20am
A team of scientists from the University of St Andrews has developed a new computer modelling tool for assessing the impact of noise from human disturbance, such as offshore wind development, on marine mammal populations.

How volcanic lightning is helping to demystify the Earth's plasmasphere

July 2, 2015 - 4:45am
At the height of the First World War, in the trenches, German physicist Heinrich Barkhausen was eavesdropping on Allied telephone conversations. Every now and again, the Allied communications were drowned out by some strange sounds. The soldiers dubbed them "whistlers" because they sounded similar to shells flying overhead.

Why Apple Music could crush the streaming business

July 1, 2015 - 11:46am

Opinion: Apple Music poses a substantial threat to rival on-demand music streaming services, particularly Spotify.

Fishing groups ask court to halt ocean seismic testing

July 1, 2015 - 11:33am
POINT PLEASANT BEACH, N.J. (AP) -- Five fishing groups asked a federal court to stop scientists from blasting the ocean floor with sound waves, arguing their research is disturbing marine life off the New Jersey coast by exposing animals to noise comparable to a space shuttle launch or a nuclear bomb....

Global pharma firms grilled about tax in Australia

July 1, 2015 - 1:00am
The world's top pharmaceutical companies Wednesday told an Australian parliamentary hearing they were compliant with local and international laws, despite claims they are charging higher prices to minimise tax.

Universal Rhythm: People Dance to Same Beat Across the Globe

June 30, 2015 - 4:28pm
A new analysis of music from diverse cultures around the globe reveals that all music shares certain universal features, such as having a simple beat. And these characteristics tend to be those that bring people together, the researchers said.

Apple Music goes live as tech giant bids on streaming

June 30, 2015 - 12:42pm
Apple's new streaming service went live Tuesday with a flashy radio station and artist exclusives as the company that had dominated digital music through iTunes looks to the future.

High-fat diet may alleviate mitochondrial disease

June 30, 2015 - 11:53am
Mice that have a genetic version of mitochondrial disease can easily be mistaken for much older animals by the time they are nine months old: they have thinning grey hair, osteoporosis, poor hearing, infertility, heart problems and have lost weight. Dietary fat, coupled with a natural hormone, can relieve symptoms in these mice, researchers have found.

Babbler bird calls 'convey meaning'

June 30, 2015 - 10:28am
A bird can communicate by rearranging sounds into calls that convey meaning in the same way that humans use language, say scientists.

Mapping ocean noise on a round-the-world sailing trip

June 30, 2015 - 6:05am
20,000 Sounds under the Sea is a project that aims to study ocean sounds. The Swiss ship Fleur de Passion will go around the world in four years with the aim of measuring human impact on oceans and contributing to the debate surrounding the role of humankind at sea.

US Military's Hypersonic Jet Could Fly 5 Times the Speed of Sound

June 30, 2015 - 5:14am
The U.S. military is reportedly developing a hypersonic jet plane that could soar at up to five times the speed of sound — faster than a bullet, which generally travels at Mach 2, or twice the speed of sound.

These 'babbler' birds could shed light on human language

June 30, 2015 - 5:00am
Move over, parrots. Here's another bird with some impressive "language" skills: The chestnut-crowned babbler. Scientists studying the social birds have discovered that they can rearrange meaningless sounds in their calls to form different, meaningful messages.

Humans around the world dance to the same beat

June 29, 2015 - 2:22pm
A new study has found that songs from around the world tend to share features, including a strong rhythm, that enable coordination in social situations and encourage group bonding.

Key element of human language discovered in bird babble

June 29, 2015 - 1:22pm
Stringing together meaningless sounds to create meaningful signals was previously thought to be the preserve of humans alone, but a new study has revealed that babbler birds are also able to communicate in this way.

Study reveals a common beat in global music

June 29, 2015 - 1:00pm
A new study carried out by the University of Exeter and Tokyo University of the Arts has found that songs from around the world tend to share features, including a strong rhythm, that enable coordination in social situations and encourage group bonding.

Key element of human language discovered in bird babble

June 29, 2015 - 12:00pm
Stringing together meaningless sounds to create meaningful signals was previously thought to be the preserve of humans alone, but a new study has revealed that babbler birds are also able to communicate in this way.

Muscial classification system: Computers get with the beat

June 29, 2015 - 10:42am
As yet another music streaming service comes online to rival the countless available outlets for so many different genres, a new approach to classifying music to make archiving, sorting and music discovery easier.

Looking for love on a dating app? You may find music instead

June 29, 2015 - 10:30am
In your quest to find a date, a spouse or a hook-up, you might discover something else when using dating apps: new music.

Computers get with the beat: Automatic classification of music by genre

June 29, 2015 - 10:14am
As yet another music streaming service comes online to rival the countless available outlets for so many different genres, a new approach to classifying music to make archiving, sorting and music discovery easier is published in the International Journal of Computational Intelligence Studies.

Cattle ID system shows its muzzle

June 29, 2015 - 10:10am
Maybe it sounds like a cow and bull story, but researchers in Egypt are developing a biometric identification system for cattle that could reduce food fraud and allow ranchers to control their stock more efficiently. The system described in the International Journal of Image Mining uses the unique features of a prominent part of the animal to identify the beasts. No, it's not hoof prints or an udder body part - it's the bovine muzzle, no pair of which are exactly alike, according to computer scientist Hamdi Mahmoud of BeniSuef University, in Cairo.