Go to content Go to navigation Go to search
A traveling exhibition about the sounds and songs of life

Wild Music in the News

Syndicate content
Pipes Output
Updated: 8 min 58 sec ago

The secrets of children's chatter: research shows boys and girls learn language differently

June 27, 2014 - 7:45am
Experts believe language uses both a mental dictionary and a mental grammar.  The mental ‘dictionary’ stores sounds, words and common phrases, while mental ‘grammar’ involves the real-time composition of longer words and sentences. For example, making a longer word ‘walked’ from a smaller one ‘walk’.

Soundhawk brings out system for smarter listening

June 26, 2014 - 11:00am
On Tuesday, Cupertino, California-based Soundhawk announced they were unveiling their Smart Listening System and taking pre-orders. The set allows the user to make the most of sounds in everyday living, letting the person choose. Think of smarter listening. CEO Michael Kisch said, "We created Soundhawk to help each of us hear more of what matters most." Vision is extremely important to how we experience our environment and hearing is too. Much of what we learn is by listening. In modern life, especially in urban environments, there is a lot of sound out there competing with what we need to hear, competing with street drills to barking dogs to traffic horns, to indoor and noisy restaurants and cafes, and we try not to miss things. Having to ask callers or neighbors to repeat or shout is tedious and uncomfortable; the company is offering a way for easier listening.

Genetics and environment work together to help people become accomplished musicians, study finds

June 26, 2014 - 10:19am
Mom or dad may have driven you to cello rehearsal all those years, but you can also thank your genes for pushing you to practice, according to new research. Genetics and environment work together to help people become accomplished musicians, finds the study of 850 sets of twins. It's another arrow in the quiver of the argument that both nature and nurture play a role in developing expertise.

Chimps like listening to music with a different beat

June 26, 2014 - 10:16am
While preferring silence to music from the West, chimpanzees apparently like to listen to the different rhythms of music from Africa and India, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Chimps prefer African, Indian tunes over strong beats typical of Western music, research finds

June 26, 2014 - 10:04am
While preferring silence to music from the West, chimpanzees apparently like to listen to the different rhythms of music from Africa and India, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

We speak as we feel, we feel as we speak

June 26, 2014 - 7:57am
Ground-breaking experiments have been conduced to uncover the links between language and emotions. Researchers were able to demonstrate that the articulation of vowels systematically influences our feelings and vice versa. The authors concluded that it would seem that language users learn that the articulation of 'i' sounds is associated with positive feelings and thus make use of corresponding words to describe positive circumstances. The opposite applies to the use of 'o' sounds.

NASA sets new dates for saucer-shaped test vehicle flight

June 26, 2014 - 7:20am
NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project plans to fly its rocket-powered, saucer-shaped landing technology test vehicle into near-space from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) on Kauai, Hawaii, later this week.

Chimps like listening to music with a different beat, research finds

June 25, 2014 - 10:00pm
(American Psychological Association) Nonhuman primates preferred African, Indian tunes over strong beats typical of Western music.

People with tinnitus process emotions differently from their peers, researchers report

June 25, 2014 - 4:49pm
Patients with persistent ringing in the ears -- a condition known as tinnitus -- process emotions differently in the brain from those with normal hearing, researchers report. Tinnitus afflicts 50 million people in the United States, and causes those with the condition to hear noises that aren't really there. These phantom sounds are not speech, but rather whooshing noises, train whistles, cricket noises or whines. Their severity often varies day to day.

T-Mobile: Take an iPhone for a free test drive

June 25, 2014 - 3:31pm

At a Seattle event Wednesday, the wireless carrier announced plans to let users "test drive" iPhones for a free one-week trial period and a new music-streaming service. 

Study: 50,000-year-old poop proves Neanderthals ate their veggies

June 25, 2014 - 3:15pm
As gross as it sounds, samples of the world's oldest known human feces are offering scientists new insight into the gastronomic behavior of our extinct, meat-loving cousins, the Neanderthals.

NASA's New Mars-Landing Tech Gets 1st Test Flight Saturday

June 25, 2014 - 1:34pm
The space agency aims to loft its Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator test vehicle Saturday from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Hawaii. The launch window opens at 2:15 p.m. EDT; you can watch all the action here on Space.com.

Rosanne Cash to US Congress: streaming killing music

June 25, 2014 - 12:10pm
The country star Rosanne Cash warned Wednesday that paltry returns to artists in the age of Internet streaming threaten to kill the music industry, as US lawmakers work on an overhaul.

People with tinnitus process emotions differently from their peers, researchers report

June 24, 2014 - 10:00pm
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Patients with persistent ringing in the ears -- a condition known as tinnitus -- process emotions differently in the brain from those with normal hearing, researchers report in the journal Brain Research.

Organic farm in Benin looks to set example for Africa

June 24, 2014 - 10:40am
With his pilgrim's staff and panama hat, Father Godfrey Nzamujo nips up and down the paths of Songhai, the organic farm he created nearly 30 years ago to fight poverty and rural migration in Africa.

New, enhanced security of data storage and transmission via optical 'marked ghost imaging' technology

June 24, 2014 - 9:00am
"Ghost imaging" sounds like the spooky stuff of frivolous fiction, but it's an established technique for reconstructing hi-res images of objects partly obscured by clouds or smoke. Now a group of researchers at the National University of Singapore (NUS) is applying the same idea in reverse to securing stored or shared electronic data.

The goose bump sensor: A step toward direct detection of human emotional states

June 24, 2014 - 9:00am
Can emotional states be measured quantitatively, and if so what would advertising, manufacturing and social media companies do with that data? Imagine a world in which a consumer's real-time physical and emotional response helped to determine his/her experience of music, online ads or the temperature in the room.

High fluctuation rate at cantonal parliaments

June 24, 2014 - 7:25am
There is significant fluctuation at Swiss cantonal parliaments, according to a study. The composition of parliaments in Western Switzerland has seen the fastest rate of change, while the term of office of politicians in Eastern Switzerland is the longest.

Music Changes the Way You Think

June 24, 2014 - 5:00am
Different music encourages different frames of mind

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Master regulator of key cancer gene found, offers new drug target

June 23, 2014 - 10:00pm
(University of Minnesota Academic Health Center) A key cancer-causing gene, responsible for up to 20 percent of cancers, may have a weak spot in its armor, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota.The partnership of MYC, a gene long linked to cancer, and a non-coding RNA, PVT1, could be the key to understanding how MYC fuels cancer cells. The research is published in the latest issue of the journal Nature.