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Wild Music in the News

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Updated: 1 min 53 sec ago

Echo, Amazon's answer to Siri, is a speaker that listens to you

November 14, 2014 - 1:46pm

On Thursday, Amazon announced the Echo: a personal assistant in the form of a speaker. The $199 Amazon Echo can play music, take dictation, tell jokes, and read news summaries.

YouTube brings its huge fan base to music streaming

November 14, 2014 - 11:10am
The music industry's move toward paid subscription services, and away from discs and downloads, has been underway for several years.

Want to improve your putt? Try listening to jazz

November 14, 2014 - 4:31am
Listening to jazz music while putting can boost your performance on the putting green, according to new university research.

Sonorous Science: Making Music with Bottles

November 13, 2014 - 10:00am
A musical physics project from Science Buddies

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

TV sound system for the hard of hearing

November 13, 2014 - 8:46am
Families often watch TV together, but what happens when one member has hearing difficulties? Usually the result is a compromise on listening volume that doesn't really satisfy anyone.

Music streaming under fire, but soaring

November 13, 2014 - 3:20am
Taylor Swift has unleashed a debate on streaming by pulling her music from Spotify, but plenty of others are rushing to join in, rather than trying—in the singer's words—to shake it off.

Apple iPod antitrust trial: Consumers say iTunes was monopoly

November 12, 2014 - 2:40pm
It's been shuffling through the courts for a decade, a class-action suit that challenges Apple's iPod and iTunes grip on the digital song market. Now, it's time to face the music.

Listen to a Glacier, Forecast a Flood

November 12, 2014 - 1:12pm

They're not as catchy as Vanilla Ice's self-aggrandizing single, nor as funky as the pioneering blues of Muddy Waters. But tuning in to the harmonies produced as water courses through icy cracks in a glacier could eventually come as life-saving music to the ears of their neighbors.

YouTube adds subscription service to music mix

November 12, 2014 - 12:42pm
Google is remixing the music on its YouTube video site with the addition of an ad-free subscription service and a new format designed to make it easier to find millions of songs that can still be played for free.

"We Are on the Comet!"

November 12, 2014 - 12:10pm
Some sounds from the Rosetta Mission team today after they succeeded in landing on Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. Steve Mirsky reports  

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Want to improve your putt? Try listening to jazz

November 12, 2014 - 9:25am
Listening to jazz music while putting can boost your performance on the putting green, according to new research. While any kind of music improves performance compared to listening to no music at all, jazz is the most effective musical genre for improving putting.

Listen to a Glacier, Forecast a Flood

November 12, 2014 - 9:02am
The sounds produced by water flowing through glaciers could save lives by predicting natural disasters

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Best supporting actors -- in your ears? Research points to potential way to restore hearing

November 12, 2014 - 8:30am
There’s a cast of characters deep inside your ears -- many kinds of tiny cells working together to allow you to hear. The lead actors, called hair cells, play the crucial role in carrying sound signals to the brain. But new research shows that when it comes to restoring lost hearing ability, the spotlight may fall on some of the ear’s supporting actors – and their understudies.

Rosetta's comet sings strange, seductive song

November 12, 2014 - 6:20am
Scientists can't figure exactly why yet, but Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko has been singing since at least August. Listen to the video – what do you think? I hear a patter that sounds like frogs, purring and ping-pong balls. The song is being sung at a frequency of 40-50 millihertz, much lower than the 20 hertz – 20 kilohertz range of human hearing. Rosetta's magnetometer experiment first clearly picked up the sounds in August, when the spacecraft drew to within 62 miles (100 km) of the comet. To make them audible Rosetta scientists increased their pitch 10,000 times. 

Best supporting actors in your ears? Research points to potential way to restore hearing

November 11, 2014 - 11:00pm
(University of Michigan Health System) There's a cast of characters deep inside your ears -- many kinds of tiny cells working together to allow you to hear. The lead actors, called hair cells, play the crucial role in carrying sound signals to the brain. But new research shows that when it comes to restoring lost hearing ability, the spotlight may fall on some of the ear's supporting actors -- and their understudies.

Listen to This: Comet's Eerie 'Song' Captured by Rosetta Spacecraft

November 11, 2014 - 5:59pm
Scientists have picked up on the mysterious "song" of a comet speeding through deep space.

Spotify defends payout norms after Taylor Swift withdraws music

November 11, 2014 - 4:52pm
Spotify's chief executive said Tuesday his company was on the side of musicians after popular US artist Taylor Swift withdrew her music from the online music service over a payments spat.

Rosetta’s Comet Sounds Like This (Magnetic Oscillations) | Video

November 11, 2014 - 10:57am
Comet 67P/C-G is humming. ESA’s Rosetta probe detected cyclical changes in the comet’s magnetic field environment. To make the comet’s magnetic ‘song’ audible to people, researchers sped up the data 10,000 times its actual rate.

Rosetta's singing comet

November 11, 2014 - 10:11am
A set of instruments on the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft has picked up a mysterious "song" from Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. On Wednesday, Nov. 12, Rosetta will attempt the first-ever soft landing on a comet when it dispatches its Philae lander to the surface of comet 67P.

Sweet music or sour notes? Test will tell

November 10, 2014 - 2:08pm
Most people rarely sing publically outside of “Happy Birthday.” And since that particular song is usually offered as a group performance, even the reluctant join in, hoping their individual shortcomings will be cloaked by the chorus. One psychologist believes that most people are not as bad at singing as they might think and he is collaborating on the development of an online test that will evaluate participants’ ability to match specific tones and melodies.