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Updated: 22 min 51 sec ago

Professor examines convergence of languages, cultures in Chinese Inner Asia

September 18, 2014 - 5:50am
When Arienne Dwyer identified an area in Chinese Inner Asia as a language convergence zone some 19 years ago, she discovered that the grammars of unrelated languages had grown to resemble one another. Moreover, when some speakers of these diverse languages come together in song contests, they would harmonize their melodies even faster than their languages.

Americans rate losing eyesight as having greatest impact on their lives

September 17, 2014 - 10:00pm
(Research!America) Many Americans across racial and ethnic groups describe losing eyesight as potentially having the greatest impact on their day-to-day life, more so than other conditions including: loss of limb, memory, hearing and speech (57 percent of African-Americans, 49 percent of non-Hispanic whites, 43 percent of Asians and 38 percent of Hispanics).

The mobility model is closely linked to the city's characteristics

September 17, 2014 - 8:20am
The massive use of motor vehicles leads to a whole host of problems, such as pollution, noise, accidents, occupation of space and others, which need to be tackled in two ways, according to the authors of this research: by improving the offer of public transport and properly managing the mobility demand.

'Smart material' chin strap harvests energy from chewing

September 17, 2014 - 5:32am
A chin strap that can harvest energy from jaw movements has been created by a group of researchers in Canada. It is hoped that the device can generate electricity from eating, chewing and talking, and power a number of small-scale implantable or wearable electronic devices, such as hearing aids, cochlear implants, electronic hearing protectors and communication devices.

Chin strap turns chewing into power

September 16, 2014 - 7:27pm
Engineers build a chin strap that harnesses the energy produced by jaw movements, and could one day power hearing aids or bluetooth earpieces.

Flatow, 'Science Friday' settle claims over grant

September 16, 2014 - 1:14pm
Federal prosecutors say radio host Ira Flatow and his "Science Friday" show that airs on many National Public Radio stations have settled civil claims that they misused money from a nearly $1 million federal grant aimed at boosting the show's reach to younger listeners.

Flatow, 'Science Friday' settle claims over grant

September 16, 2014 - 12:20pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) -- Federal prosecutors say radio host Ira Flatow and his "Science Friday" show that airs on many National Public Radio stations have settled civil claims that they misused money from a nearly $1 million federal grant aimed at boosting the show's reach to younger listeners....

Bacterial communication: And so they beat on, flagella against the cantilever

September 16, 2014 - 9:17am
Researchers have developed a new model to study the motion patterns of bacteria in real time and to determine how these motions relate to communication within a bacterial colony. They chemically attached colonies of E. coli bacteria to a microcantilever, coupling its motion to that of the bacteria. As the cantilever itself isn’t doesn’t generate any vibrations, or ‘noise,’ this allowed the researchers to monitor the colony’s reactions to various stimuli in real time.

Miami Bat Squad Tracks Rare Species to Golf Course Roost

September 16, 2014 - 5:12am
The researchers use ultrasonic mikes to track down the home of the rare Florida bonneted bat, a critically endangered species

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Hey1 and Hey2 ensure inner ear 'hair cells' are made at the right time, in the right place

September 15, 2014 - 10:00pm
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Two Johns Hopkins neuroscientists have discovered the 'molecular brakes' that time the generation of important cells in the inner ear cochleas of mice. These 'hair cells' translate sound waves into electrical signals that are carried to the brain and are interpreted as sounds. If the arrangement of the cells is disordered, hearing is impaired.

And so they beat on, flagella against the cantilever

September 15, 2014 - 10:00pm
(American Institute of Physics) Researchers have developed a new model to study the motion patterns of bacteria in real time and to determine how these motions relate to communication within a bacterial colony. They chemically attached colonies of E. coli bacteria to a microcantilever, coupling its motion to that of the bacteria. As the cantilever itself isn't doesn't generate any vibrations, or 'noise,' this allowed the researchers to monitor the colony's reactions to various stimuli in real time.

Facebook vs. loneliness

September 15, 2014 - 6:10am
Are people becoming lonelier even as they feel more connected online? Hayeon Song, an assistant professor of communication at UWM, explored this topic in recent research.

Genes may help explain why some people are naturally more interested in music than others

September 14, 2014 - 10:00pm
(Wiley) Research suggests that genes that affect hearing and cognitive function may play roles in one's musical aptitude, or the ability to understand and perceive rhythm, pitch, timbre, tone durations, and formal structure in music.

Favoritism linked to drug use in 'disengaged' families

September 12, 2014 - 9:25am
In families, the perception that parents have a favorite is linked with the less-favored children being twice as likely to use alcohol, cigarettes or drugs. For parents worrying about keeping score and managing perceptions of fairness, one expert has some very simple advice. "Show your love to your kids at a greater extent than you currently are. As simple as it sounds, more warmth and less conflict is probably the best answer."

Natural soundscapes may become 'digital fossils' of the future

September 11, 2014 - 12:19pm
Sounds are integral to Henry David Thoreau's "Walden," the book about two years he spent living in a cabin in the woods near Walden Pond in Massachusetts in 1846-47 - the wind blowing through the rushes, the rumbling of the ice melting in the spring, owls screeching in the night.

Hawaii town's merchants meet to discuss lava flow

September 11, 2014 - 9:12am

A crowd listens to county officials discuss Kilauea's lava flow during at meeting Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2014 in Pahoa, Hawaii.

Universal Social Rules Underlie Languages

September 11, 2014 - 7:15am
Listening in on conversations around the world reveals that human dialogue follows some universal rules that enable and enrich our social interactions

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

University launches new software training computers to understand language of musicians

September 11, 2014 - 6:50am
New software launched today by researchers at Birmingham City University aims to reduce the long periods of training and expensive equipment required to make music, whilst also giving musicians more intuitive control over the music that they produce.

Testing Males and Females in Every Medical Experiment Is a Bad Idea

September 11, 2014 - 6:15am
Requiring medical researchers to test males and females in every experiment sounds reasonable, but it is a bad idea

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Diverse neighborhoods may help infants' social learning

September 10, 2014 - 4:59pm
Experiencing diverse communities by hearing different languages at the park, on a bus or in the grocery store may make babies more open-minded in their social learning, a new study finds.