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Wild Music in the News

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Updated: 54 min 17 sec ago

Sounds of praise or tones of racism? A look at the marketing of christian music

July 14, 2015 - 6:54am
A novel investigation into the marketing of Christian music suggests that the power of music could be contributing to the powerful racial divide that remains in the nation's Christian churches.

Researchers identify zebra-like stripes of plasma in a patch of space

July 14, 2015 - 6:24am
Since the early 1970s, orbiting satellites have picked up on noise-like plasma waves very close to the Earth's magnetic field equator. This "equatorial noise," as it was then named, seemed to be an unruly mess of electric and magnetic fields oscillating at different frequencies in the form of plasma waves.

Scientists expect evolutionary changes from loud, bright world

July 14, 2015 - 6:03am
Humans take for granted the noise and lights associated with cities and other developments across the landscape.  For other creatures, these noisy and bright conditions lead to changes in behavior and activity such as the timing or pitch of a bird song in the morning.  Scientists have long recorded these changes and now seek to understand whether these altered environments are driving evolution itself.

Important step in breast cancer research

July 13, 2015 - 7:53am
Scientists have been working for some time on a new technique to detect breast cancer. The technique based on the physical principle of photoacoustics, has been christened PAMmography. It uses short bursts of light that cause ultrasonic waves to be generated in places with high density of blood vessels, such as in the vicinity of malignant tumors. The scientists show that breast tumors have specific manifestations and forms in images made using their technique.

Found: A likely new contributor to age-related hearing loss

July 13, 2015 - 7:51am
Conventional wisdom has long blamed age-related hearing loss almost entirely on the death of sensory hair cells in the inner ear, but research from neuroscientists has provided new information about the workings of nerve cells that suggests otherwise.

Making sense of our evolution

July 13, 2015 - 7:10am
The science about our our special senses - vision, smell, hearing and taste - offers fascinating and unique perspectives on our evolution.

Found: A likely new contributor to age-related hearing loss

July 12, 2015 - 10:00pm
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Conventional wisdom has long blamed age-related hearing loss almost entirely on the death of sensory hair cells in the inner ear, but research from neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins has provided new information about the workings of nerve cells that suggests otherwise.

Review: Apple Music impresses a subscription skeptic

July 12, 2015 - 5:40pm
I've never been a fan of subscription music services, but Apple Music might make me change my mind.

A day with Apple Music: What it is and what it isn't (+video)

July 11, 2015 - 3:01pm

Apple launched its streaming service on Tuesday. Here's a hands-on experience of a user's first day with Apple Music.

Why Apple Music could crush the streaming business (+video)

July 11, 2015 - 3:01pm

Apple Music poses a substantial threat to rival on-demand music streaming services, particularly Spotify.

Photos: Spike Aerospace's Luxurious Supersonic Jet

July 11, 2015 - 5:51am
Spike Aerospace, a Boston-based company, is designing a supersonic jet that could fly passengers from New York to London in just 3 hours.

Music industry begins global Friday release of new albums

July 10, 2015 - 5:39pm
Big record stores, streaming services and hit charts adjusted longtime practices as the music industry Friday began a coordinated global release for new albums.

Can you actually hear 'inaudible' sound?

July 10, 2015 - 10:35am
Are wind farms harmful to humans? This controversial topic makes emotions run high. To give the debate more objectivity, an international team of experts dealt with the fundamentals of hearing in the lower limit range of the audible frequency range (i.e., infrasound), but also in the upper limit range (i.e., ultrasound).

Leveraging the Internet's unique data repositories

July 10, 2015 - 8:20am
Sometimes, data doesn't look like data. But when circumstances conspire and the right researchers come along, interesting facets of human nature reveal themselves. Last.fm and World of Warcraft are two entities made possible by the Internet, both aimed at entertainment of consumers. However, through new means of social interaction and larger scales of data collection they also, perhaps unintentionally, advanced science. Scientific achievement may seem like a stretch for a music service and a video game, but these unlikely candidates for scientific study show that the information age constantly offers new ways to study human behavior. Last.fm and World of Warcraft are contemporary social constructions, part of the new way that humans interact in our rapidly changing digital world. By applying scientific rigor to the data unwittingly generated by two Internet-based companies, we see that knowledge is everywhere, but sometimes requires creative routes to coax it out of hiding.

AUDIO: When jazz collided with physics

July 9, 2015 - 12:44pm
The Large Hadron Collider and jazz pianist Al Blatter make an unlikely musical duet at the Montreux Jazz Festival

Hearing test pinpoints middle-ear problems in newborns

July 9, 2015 - 11:26am
Screening method can reduce false-positive hearing results, reducing need for extensive followup tests, family stress, researchers say. In their study, audiologists used high-frequency tympanometry to test middle-ear function in 31 infants between the ages of one week and six months.

With acoustic reflector, carnivorous pitcher plants advertise themselves to bats

July 9, 2015 - 11:24am
In Borneo, some insectivorous bats have developed a rather intriguing relationship with carnivorous pitcher plants. The plants offer the bats a relatively cool place to roost, free of parasites and competition from other bats. In return, the bats keep the plants well fertilized with their droppings. Now, researchers show that the plants rely on special structures to reflect the bats' ultrasonic calls back to them.

Carnivorous Plant Lures in Pooping Bats | Video

July 9, 2015 - 10:27am
The Pitcher plant (N. hemsleyana) structure reflects ultrasonic calls from insectivorous bats (Kerivoula hardwicki) and "relatively cool place to roost." The bats leave dropping behind providing a fertilizer for the plants.

With acoustic reflector, carnivorous pitcher plants advertise themselves to bats

July 9, 2015 - 10:00am
In Borneo, some insectivorous bats have developed a rather intriguing relationship with carnivorous pitcher plants. The plants offer the bats a relatively cool place to roost, free of parasites and competition from other bats. In return, the bats keep the plants well fertilized with their droppings. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 9 show that the plants rely on special structures to reflect the bats' ultrasonic calls back to them. That adaptation of the plants makes it easier for bats to find their plant partners in the cluttered forest.

We could find aliens any day now—SETI scientists discuss extraterrestrial life hunting

July 9, 2015 - 6:27am
ET phone Earth! We could be on the verge of answering one of the essential questions of humanity that has captivated our minds for centuries. As we advance in technology the search for extraterrestrial life becomes more sophisticated and promising. But the real frosting on the cake would be finding any signs of an intelligent alien civilization. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project is looking carefully for these signs, listening to the Universe that may be full of potential ET signals. In an interview with astrowatch.net, key figures of alien life hunting discuss the ongoing search for extraterrestrial life. SETI's Seth Shostak, Paul Shuch, Douglas Vakoch and Gerry Harp talk the odds of finding ETs, explain the famous "Wow!" signal received in 1977 and unveil the future of the search for aliens.