Go to content Go to navigation Go to search
A traveling exhibition about the sounds and songs of life

Wild Music in the News

Syndicate content
Pipes Output
Updated: 27 min 16 sec ago

NASA successfully tests shape-changing wing for next generation aviation

April 29, 2015 - 4:46am
NASA researchers, working in concert with the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and FlexSys Inc., of Ann Arbor, Michigan, successfully completed initial flight tests of a new morphing wing technology that has the potential to save millions of dollars annually in fuel costs, reduce airframe weight and decrease aircraft noise during takeoffs and landings.

Seat installed in supersonic car

April 28, 2015 - 6:47am
Land-speed record-holder Andy Green sees the installation of the seat he will use in the 1,000mph Bloodhound Super Sonic Car.

Acoustical Society of America Spring Meeting in Pittsburgh, May 18-22, 2015

April 27, 2015 - 10:00pm
(Acoustical Society of America) From noise in buildings and open park spaces to musical instruments, human voices and the vocalizations of animals on the ground, in the air and underwater, the science of sound is all around. The world's largest scientific meeting devoted to this fascinating, many-faceted field of acoustics will take place next month in Pittsburgh.

Musical Performance Activates Specific Genes

April 27, 2015 - 4:35pm
Blood tests on 10 professional musicians before and after playing showed that specific genes got turned on by performance, some of which are also active in songbirds. Karen Hopkin reports  

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Tinkling Spoons Can Trigger Seizures in Cats

April 27, 2015 - 3:07pm
The U.K. charity International Cat Care reached out to veterinary specialists after receiving surprising complaints from cat owners: Their feline companions were apparently having seizures in response to high-pitched sounds.

High-pitched sounds cause seizures in old cats: Certain breeds more susceptible

April 27, 2015 - 2:36pm
Sharp high-pitched sounds have been found to cause seizures in older cats. The most commonly reported triggers were the sound of crinkling tin foil, a metal spoon clanging in a ceramic feeding bowl, chinking or tapping of glass, crinkling of paper or plastic bags, tapping on a computer keyboard or clicking of a mouse, clinking of coins or keys, hammering of a nail and even the clicking of an owner's tongue.

High-pitched sounds cause seizures in old cats

April 27, 2015 - 2:00pm
When the charity International Cat Care asked veterinary neurologists at Davies Veterinary Specialists, UK, for help with several enquiries it had received regarding cats having seizures, seemingly in response to certain high-pitched sounds, the answer was that the problem was not documented and little, if anything, was known about it.

Lightweight membrane can significantly reduce in-flight aircraft noise

April 27, 2015 - 10:50am
Riding in a helicopter or airplane can be a noisy experience for passengers. But researchers from North Carolina State University and MIT have developed a membrane that can be incorporated into aircraft to drastically reduce the low-frequency noise that penetrates the cabin.

Why be creative on social media?

April 27, 2015 - 6:30am
There are five motivators for creating novel content online, whether blog posts, shared news stories, images, photos, songs, videos or any of the other digital artifacts users of social media and social networking sites share endlessly. Research just published in the International Journal of Internet Marketing and Advertising suggests that these five factors are: entertainment, self-expression, social-belonging, communication, and social-cognition.

Bats use both sides of brain to listen -- just like humans

April 27, 2015 - 6:28am
Researchers have shown that, like humans, mustached bats use the left and right sides of their brains to process different aspects of sounds. Aside from humans, no other animal that has been studied, not even monkeys or apes, has proved to use such hemispheric specialization for sound processing -- meaning that the left brain is better at processing fast sounds, and the right processing slow ones.

Detection of critical heart disease before birth lags among poor

April 27, 2015 - 6:27am
While prenatal ultrasounds are doing a good job of identifying critical congenital heart disease, those living in poor or rural communities are less likely to find out their baby has heart disease before birth than those in more affluent or urban communities.

Bats use both sides of brain to listen—just like humans

April 27, 2015 - 2:45am
Researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center and American University have shown that, like humans, mustached bats use the left and right sides of their brains to process different aspects of sounds. Aside from humans, no other animal that has been studied, not even monkeys or apes, has proved to use such hemispheric specialization for sound processing—meaning that the left brain is better at processing fast sounds, and the right processing slow ones.

Bats use both sides of brain to listen -- just like humans

April 26, 2015 - 10:00pm
(Georgetown University Medical Center) Researchers have shown that, like humans, mustached bats use the left and right sides of their brains to process different aspects of sounds. Aside from humans, no other animal that has been studied, not even monkeys or apes, has proved to use such hemispheric specialization for sound processing -- meaning that the left brain is better at processing fast sounds, and the right processing slow ones.

When A Madrassa Scholar And Jewish Reporter Become Friends

April 26, 2015 - 6:00am
It’s important to listen to the quiet men and women who are showing us a humane Islam, says author.

Despite piracy, digital music sales catch up to CDs

April 24, 2015 - 6:46am

While the music industry still struggles with online piracy, new reports show that the combination of music downloads and streaming subscriptions have brought online purchases on par with physical sales for the first time.

Soundscapes offer clues about coral reef communities

April 24, 2015 - 5:10am
Sophie Nedelec and colleagues studied sounds from coral reefs in the Gambier Archipelago, French Polynesia.

Catchy tune caught in your head? Try chewing gum

April 23, 2015 - 6:41pm
A new study suggests that if you want to get an annoying song out of your head, chewing a piece of gum might help.

Stunning Songbirds Return for Spring (Photos)

April 23, 2015 - 5:45pm
For many of us, spring has arrived when the songbirds return.

Dolphins use extra energy to communicate in noisy waters

April 23, 2015 - 11:04am
Dolphins that raise their voices to be heard in noisy environments expend extra energy in doing so, according to new research that for the first time measures the biological costs to marine mammals of trying to communicate over the sounds of ship traffic or other sources.

Dolphins use extra energy to communicate in noisy waters

April 23, 2015 - 10:15am
Dolphins that raise their voices to be heard in noisy environments expend extra energy in doing so, according to new research that for the first time measures the biological costs to marine mammals of trying to communicate over the sounds of ship traffic or other sources.