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A traveling exhibition about the sounds and songs of life

Wild Music in the News

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Updated: 47 weeks 3 days ago

3D-printed device helps computers solve cocktail-party problem

August 9, 2015 - 6:00pm
Acoustic metamaterial can sort sounds according to their direction.

Can music help people with epilepsy?

August 9, 2015 - 7:28am
The brains of people with epilepsy appear to react to music differently from the brains of those who do not have the disorder, a finding that could lead to new therapies to prevent seizures, according to new research.

Silently suffering from hearing loss negatively affects quality of life

August 7, 2015 - 11:12am
Hearing loss in adults is under treated despite evidence that hearing aid technology can significantly lessen depression and anxiety and improve cognitive functioning, according to research.

Apple Music has more than 11 million members

August 6, 2015 - 9:14am
Apple says more than 11 million people have signed up for a trial of its music streaming service since it launched on June 30.

Is human noise pollution affecting our sharks?

August 6, 2015 - 6:40am
Human made noise, also called anthropogenic noise, is rising in many environments due to the increase in transportation and the exploration for and exploitation of energy sources.

The Compound Eye lossless digital imaging system

August 6, 2015 - 5:29am
The imaging process is often affected by the field of view, wavefront aberration, ambient light, as well as the resolution of the optical imaging system and detector. In such cases, the image information of the object cannot be accurately transferred to the image plane, resulting in distortion, deviation and noise convolution that affect the ultimate image quality.

Ultra-rapid air vehicle proposed in Airbus patent

August 6, 2015 - 3:00am
Two inventors have had a vision of a hypersonic rocket-powered jetliner. A 17-page patent document has described that vision, titled "Ultra-rapid air vehicle and related method for aerial locomotion." Inventors are listed as Marco Prampolini and Yohann Coraboeuf.

Facebook debuts live video for celebs

August 5, 2015 - 4:00pm
Facebook announced Wednesday it was launching live streaming video to allow actors, musicians and other celebrities a new way to connect with their fans.

Researchers find romantic kissing is not the norm in most cultures

August 5, 2015 - 3:19pm
For generations, passionate kisses immortalized in movies, songs and the arts have served as a thermometer of romantic affection.

Romantic kissing is not the norm in most cultures

August 5, 2015 - 1:57pm
For generations, passionate kisses immortalized in movies, songs and the arts have served as a thermometer of romantic affection. But current research has found that not only is romantic kissing not the norm in most cultures, some find it uncomfortable and even flat-out repulsive.

Tracking spacecraft through the cosmos music contest

August 5, 2015 - 4:01am
Musicians, composers and audio buffs are invited to help celebrate 40 years of ESA's tracking station network. Create some truly cosmic sound and you may win impressive prizes, including a trip to our anniversary gala event in Spain.

Review: Stand-alone gadgets trump all-in-one devices

August 5, 2015 - 2:33am
When Apple announced new iPod music players a few weeks ago, many people asked why anyone would need iPods when smartphones can play music and more. I had that question myself—until I remembered I've been carrying an iPod almost every day, mostly for my runs.

Researchers find romantic kissing is not the norm in most cultures

August 4, 2015 - 10:00pm
(Indiana University) For generations, passionate kisses immortalized in movies, songs and the arts have served as a thermometer of romantic affection. But current research from Indiana University has found that not only is romantic kissing not the norm in most cultures, some find it uncomfortable and even flat-out repulsive.

World's quietest gas lets physicists hear faint quantum effects

August 4, 2015 - 2:08pm
Bose-Einstein condensates have been cooled to a record 0.5 nanoKelvin, but the entropy of these gases are relatively high, meaning half the gas is normal, not quantum. Physicists have now found a way to reduce the entropy or noise in a BEC system at 1 nanoKelvin so that nearly all atoms are in the same quantum state, creating the quietest gas ever. It can be used to model quantum magnets and high-temperature superconductors.

Study explains the unique sound production by Death's head hawkmoths

August 4, 2015 - 8:28am
Their arrival used to be perceived as a bad omen: Because of their scull-like markings on their backs the Death's head hawkmoths (Acherontia atropos) were dreaded. And yet, the big moth with the dark forewings and the beige-yellow marking is unusual for more than one reason: The animals migrate annually from Africa to Europe and visit beehives from which they steal honey with their short proboscides. If the moths are irritated, they produce series of short squeaks. Scientists from the Universities Jena and Kiel, the Ernst-Abbe-Hochschule Jena and the University Hospital Jena (all Germany) looked into their unique way of producing sounds. The results of the joint research have now been published in the science magazine The Science of Nature.

Will SETI's unprecedented new program finally find E.T.?

August 4, 2015 - 7:20am
Stephen Hawking, Frank Drake and dozens of journalists gathered at the Royal Society in London last week to hear astronomers announce a ground-breaking new project to search for intelligent extraterrestrial life called "Breakthrough Listen." They will be using two of the world's largest radio telescopes (Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia and the Parkes Radio Telescope in Australia) to listen for radio messages from intelligent alien species. Scientists have chosen to target the nearest million stars as well as the nearest 100 galaxies. This project will also monitor the Galactic plane for months at a time. This unprecedented effort is a collaboration between UC Berkeley and the Breakthrough Prize Foundation, and employs an international team of astronomers and data scientists, including Frank Drake – the father of SETI (Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence).

A fluttering accordion

August 3, 2015 - 10:00pm
(Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena) Scientists from the Universities Jena and Kiel, the Ernst-Abbe-Hochschule Jena and the University Hospital Jena looked into the unique way of the Death's head hawkmoths producing sounds. They analyzed that the Death's head hawkmoth produces its sounds in a similar way to an accordion.

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015 - 1:52pm
Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. To learn and improve, the songbird brain needs to shake up its tried-and-true patterns with a healthy dose of creative experimentation. Until now, no one has found a specific mechanism by which this could occur.

How the finch changes its tune

August 2, 2015 - 10:00pm
(University of California - San Francisco) Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered a neurological mechanism that could explain how songbirds' neural creativity-generator lets them refine and alter their songs as adults.

On-chip processor the first step in point-of-care asthma and tuberculosis diagnostics

July 31, 2015 - 8:40am
A device to mix liquids utilizing ultrasonics is the first and most difficult component in a miniaturized system for low-cost analysis of sputum from patients with pulmonary diseases such as tuberculosis and asthma.