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Wild Music in the News

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The controversy over interstellar messaging

February 20, 2015 - 7:40am
Should we beam messages into deep space, announcing our presence to any extraterrestrial civilizations that might be out there? Or, should we just listen? Since the beginnings of the modern Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), radio astronomers have, for the most part, followed the listening strategy. In 1999, that consensus was shattered. Without consulting with other members of the community of scientists involved in SETI, a team of radio astronomers at the Evpatoria Radar Telescope in Crimea, led by Alexander Zaitsev, beamed an interstellar message called 'Cosmic Call' to four nearby sun-like stars. The project was funded by an American company called Team Encounter and used proceeds obtained by allowing members of the general public to submit text and images for the message in exchange for a fee.

Samsung smart TVs subject of blog on traffic intercept findings

February 20, 2015 - 4:28am
Does your Samsung TV listen to you? That is the question that was posed on Monday, February 16, by David Lodge in a Pen Test Partners blog. This is a UK-based security company. Sure, the smart TVs have a voice command facility enabled by saying something or the default "Hi TV." What interested Lodge was "a bit of a privacy concern - can Samsung listen in on you whilst you're sat on the sofa watching TV? The easiest way is to intercept some traffic from a TV and see what it's trying to do." Lodge went ahead to do his research. To intercept the traffic he used a TP-Link switch which was able to mirror traffic from one port to another, allowing him to transparently intercept the traffic. From there he could record its handshake as it joined the network and attempted to make a few voice requests in different ways. Lodge said that "This was all recorded in Wireshark and saved as a PCAP for later analysis." (Wireshark is a network protocol analyzer that lets you see what's happening on your network. It lets you capture and interactively browse traffic running on a computer network. It runs on most platforms including Windows, OS X, Linux, and Unix. Network professionals, security experts and developers use this regularly.)

Magnitude 6.5 Earthquake Shakes Island Nation Of Vanuatu

February 19, 2015 - 10:54am

CBS San Francisco Connect With Us At KPIX 5 PROGRAM GUIDE: KPIX 5 TV Schedule WATCH: A Glimpse Inside The Working KPIX 5 Newsroom Breaking News Send news tips, video & photos, and video to the KPIX 5 [...] CONNECT WITH KCBS Welcome to KCBS All News 740AM & 106.9FM on CBSSanFrancisco.com! LISTEN LIVE RIGHT NOW: KCBS Live Audio Stream LIKE KCBS Radio On Facebook: KCBS is the Bay Area's only all news station, serving listeners with [...] The U.S. Geological Survey said the earthquake measured magnitude 6.5 and struck at a depth of 10 kilometers at 12:18 a.m. Friday local time .

Supercomputer simulations explore how an air-reed instrument generates air flow and sound

February 19, 2015 - 9:17am
Toyohashi Tech's researcher has succeeded in directly predicting sound radiating from a recorder for the first time all over the world. The calculations for this study took two weeks using about 100 nodes of supercomputers. The findings contribute to proposal of a new design of musical instrument easy-to-play or totally new musical instruments.

Neighboring birds sing 'out of tune'

February 18, 2015 - 2:27pm
Great tits living next to each other may sing their songs at significantly different rates, more or less frequently, as compared to non-neighboring birds, according to a study published February 18, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Lysanne Snijders from Wageningen University, Netherlands and colleagues.

Neighboring birds sing 'out of tune'

February 18, 2015 - 1:55pm
Great tits living next to each other may sing their songs at significantly different rates, more or less frequently, as compared to non-neighboring birds.

For the first time, spacecraft catch solar shockwave in the act: 'Ultrarelativistic, killer electrons made in 60 seconds

February 18, 2015 - 1:13pm
On Oct. 8, 2013, an explosion on the sun's surface sent a supersonic blast wave of solar wind out into space. This shockwave tore past Mercury and Venus, blitzing by the moon before streaming toward Earth. The shockwave struck a massive blow to the Earth's magnetic field, setting off a magnetized sound pulse around the planet.

For the first time, spacecraft catch a solar shockwave in the act

February 18, 2015 - 11:46am
On Oct. 8, 2013, an explosion on the sun's surface sent a supersonic blast wave of solar wind out into space. This shockwave tore past Mercury and Venus, blitzing by the moon before streaming toward Earth. The shockwave struck a massive blow to the Earth's magnetic field, setting off a magnetized sound pulse around the planet.

A bodyguard for your ears: Scientists discover novel pain sensors in inner ear that warn of dangerously loud noise

February 18, 2015 - 11:30am
Our hearing has a secret bodyguard, a newly discovered connection from the cochlea to the brain that warns of intense incoming noise that causes tissue damage and hearing loss. Scientists believe it's the ear's novel pain system designed to protect it from dangerous noise. Because the ear doesn't have the nerve cells that normally detect pain, it needs its own alert system. The findings could usher new treatments for painful hearing conditions like tinnitus and hyperacusis.

Duck! At Toy Fair 2015, everything from drones to snowballs

February 18, 2015 - 10:32am
With 13,000 international buyers, Toy Fair 2015 looks and sounds like the best-behaved children's party ever. Without the young ones in attendance, of course.

Neighboring birds sing 'out of tune'

February 17, 2015 - 11:00pm
(PLOS) Great tits living next to each other may sing their songs at significantly different rates, more or less frequently, as compared to non-neighboring birds.

Dutch Windwheel draws energy innovations

February 17, 2015 - 3:20pm
The backers of the Dutch Windwheel leave few superlatives behind. The most innovative 'windmill' in the world. A showcase for clean technology. Accelerator for renewable energy. A future icon for The Netherlands and future landmark in Europe's largest port city, Rotterdam. A presence in the architectural capital of the Netherlands making the skyline even more spectacular. Superlatives may be in order for the Dutch Windwheel, an ambitious idea under the umbrella of the Dutch Windwheel Corporation, a consortium of Rotterdam based companies. The wheel makes use of EWICON (Electrostatic WInd energy CONverter) technology. In this construct, a wind turbine converts wind energy with a framework of steel tubes into electricity without moving mechanical parts. No noise. No moving shadow.

Even animals compose: What it means to be a musical species

February 17, 2015 - 11:27am
Music is found in all human cultures and thus appears to be part of our biology and not simply a cultural phenomenon. One approach to studying the biology of music is to examine other species to see if they share some of the features that make up human musicality.

Even animals compose

February 17, 2015 - 10:56am
An international research team lead by Marisa Hoeschele from the University of Vienna argue that only by combining examination of species' natural behaviour and artificially testing species for their potentials the animal foundations for our musical faculty can be discovered. Animal research could be the key to unlocking what features of human music are cultural phenomena, and what features are rooted in our biology. This work is published in the scientific journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

Speech disorders: Crowdsourcing a valid option for gathering speech ratings

February 17, 2015 - 10:41am
Crowdsourcing -- where responses to a task are aggregated across a large number of individuals recruited online -- can be an effective tool for rating sounds in speech disorders research, according to a study.

Scientists 'journey' to the center of the Earth and find...

February 17, 2015 - 10:33am

"Even though the inner core is small-smaller than the moon-it has some really interesting features," said Xiaodong Song, a professor of geology at the University of Illinois whose team has just published its work in the Journal of Geoscience . "It may tell us about how our planet formed, its history, and other dynamic processes of the Earth.

Are astronauts really weightless?

February 17, 2015 - 7:03am
Hey look! It's a montage of adorable astronauts engaging in hilarious space stuff in zero gravity. Look at them throwing bananas, playing Bowie songs, drinking floating juice balls, and generally having a gay old time in the weightlessness of deep space. It's a camera inside a ball of water, you won't believe what happens next! Or whatever it was they told you to get you to click that video.

Even animals compose

February 16, 2015 - 11:00pm
(University of Vienna) Music is found in all human cultures and thus appears to be part of our biology and not simply a cultural phenomenon. One approach to studying the biology of music is to examine other species to see if they share some of the features that make up human musicality.

Tsunami Warning Issued Following Magnitude 6.9 Quake Off Japan Coast

February 16, 2015 - 7:49pm

CBS San Francisco Connect With Us At KPIX 5 PROGRAM GUIDE: KPIX 5 TV Schedule WATCH: A Glimpse Inside The Working KPIX 5 Newsroom Breaking News Send news tips, video & photos, and video to the KPIX 5 [] CONNECT WITH KCBS Welcome to KCBS All News 740AM & 106.9FM on CBSSanFrancisco.com! LISTEN LIVE RIGHT NOW: KCBS Live Audio Stream LIKE KCBS Radio On Facebook: KCBS is the Bay Area's only all news station, serving listeners with [] TOKYO - A strong earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 6.9 was recorded off northeastern Japan on Tuesday, the U.S. Geological Survey said, and the Japan Meteorological Agency issued a tsunami warning.

Virtual-twin plan could support surgery for soldiers

February 16, 2015 - 4:10am
A Saturday story in the MIRROR.CO.UK, the online edition of the Daily Mirror, carried a headline that made readers look once, twice, three times: "'Virtual twins' could save lives as doctors prepare to test technology by CLONING soldiers set to do battle." The story nonetheless made useful reading for practical purposes. The story, along with other reports from news sites, is about a technology approach presented at a scientific meeting event with the entire world listening. Soldiers headed for battle duty could be scanned before deploying and their body twin kept online.