Go to content Go to navigation Go to search
A traveling exhibition about the sounds and songs of life

Wild Music in the News

Syndicate content
Pipes Output
Updated: 4 min 41 sec ago

Best of Last Week – New type of qubit created, Hubble sees a glowing galaxy and extreme agreeing may solve disagreements

July 21, 2014 - 7:00am
(Phys.org) —Summer may be on us (at least in the northern hemisphere) but scientists are still busy conducting research, particularly at the Large Hadron Collider as physicists detect process even rarer than the long-sought Higgs particle—after two years of study they've found evidence of a process that can be used to test the mechanism involved where the Higgs imparts mass to other particles. Also, another team has found that entanglement between particle and wave-like states of light resembles Schrodinger's cat experiment. They found a way to entangle a particle wave and a photon creating a new type of qubit that might be useful for quantum computing and which might also be the closest analogy of Schrödinger's Gedankenexperiment realized so far. Another group working on a test of equivalence principle searches for effects of spin-gravity coupling—they used a quantum sensor to investigate gravitational interaction to test the equivalence principle by comparing the gravitational interaction for a bosonic particle to that of a fermionic particle.

Studying estrogens made by the brain may offer new insights in learning and memory

July 20, 2014 - 10:00pm
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) New studies being launched by neurobiologist Luke Remage-Healey at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will investigate how estrogens produced in the brains of young birds enhance their ability to learn songs during a critical window during development. This period has a parallel to universal language development in human children.

Study provides insights into birds' migration routes

July 20, 2014 - 10:00pm
(Wiley) By tracking hybrids between songbird species, investigators have found that migration routes are under genetic control and could be preventing interbreeding. The research, which is published in Ecology Letters, was conducted using geolocators that, like GPS, record the position of a bird and allow its long distance movement to be tracked.

US opens door to East Coast offshore oil and gas drilling

July 18, 2014 - 11:40pm
The United States on Friday opened the way to offshore oil and gas exploration in the Atlantic Ocean, authorizing the controversial use of sonic cannons for seismic surveys.

Boy's Ear Problems Had Rare Cause: Gut Disease

July 18, 2014 - 3:25pm
A 10-year-old boy suffered from ear pain and hearing problems for years before doctors were finally able to crack the case.

Traffic Noise Is No Picnic for Prairie Dogs

July 18, 2014 - 3:03pm
Graeme Shannon, a postdoctoral behavioral ecologist at Colorado State University, studied how prairie dogs coped with the loud sounds of traffic. The findings are important for people who manage noise pollution.

"Alive Inside" Shows How Music Can Break Through the Fog of Dementia

July 18, 2014 - 2:54pm
A documentary captures people with dementia reconnecting to emotions and lost memories through music

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Obama opens Eastern Seaboard to oil exploration

July 18, 2014 - 1:33pm

The Obama administration is reopening the Eastern Seaboard to offshore oil and gas exploration, announcing final approval Friday of sonic cannons that can pinpoint energy deposits deep beneath the ocean floor.

There's a kind of Hush surrounding quantum systems

July 18, 2014 - 5:50am
(Phys.org) —Has a persistent noise ever kept you awake at night? Well it isn't just you. Scientists at The University of Nottingham have had the same problem with quantum technologies.

Software can decode bird songs

July 18, 2014 - 1:43am
Scientists have developed a highly advanced bird song decoder, which can automatically identify the call of a vast variety of birds.

Scientific American Editor Testifies at U.S. Senate

July 17, 2014 - 10:17pm
At a hearing on the future of federal research investment, a science magazine editor and three noted scientists asked the U.S. Senate to support basic research

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Is the universe a bubble? Let's check

July 17, 2014 - 11:08am
Perimeter Associate Faculty member Matthew Johnson and his colleagues are working to bring the multiverse hypothesis, which to some sounds like a fanciful tale, firmly into the realm of testable science.

Is the universe a bubble? Let's check: Making the multiverse hypothesis testable

July 17, 2014 - 10:48am
Scientists are working to bring the multiverse hypothesis, which to some sounds like a fanciful tale, firmly into the realm of testable science. Never mind the Big Bang; in the beginning was the vacuum. The vacuum simmered with energy (variously called dark energy, vacuum energy, the inflation field, or the Higgs field). Like water in a pot, this high energy began to evaporate -- bubbles formed.

Birdsongs automatically decoded by computer scientists

July 17, 2014 - 7:49am
Scientists have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike.

'Voice Recognition' System for Birds Can Tell Two Chirps Apart

July 17, 2014 - 6:04am
A new method of decoding bird songs from large sets of recordings could help both expert and amateur bird-watchers identify which birds are present, researchers say.

US Too Dependent on Russian Rocket Engines, Experts Tell Lawmakers

July 17, 2014 - 5:11am
Experts told a Senate hearing Wednesday that key American national-security space missions could be delayed by four to six years if Russia decides to cut off its supply of RD-180 rocket engines.

Computer scientists decode birdsongs automatically

July 17, 2014 - 5:00am
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike.

Birdsongs automatically decoded by computer scientists

July 16, 2014 - 10:00pm
(Queen Mary, University of London) Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike.

Microsoft hopes new Kinect for Windows sparks app revolution

July 16, 2014 - 4:01pm

Released in 2010, Microsoft's Kinect was designed as an add-on for Microsoft gaming consoles. But thanks to amateur Windows developers, it has since then been used for applications as varied as musical performance and analyzing CAT scans. What innovations will developers think up for this new version? 

Yahoo spotlights live music to shine on Internet stage

July 16, 2014 - 12:30am
Yahoo's hopes for renewed stardom on the Internet stage are being pinned on a song.