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Wild Music in the News

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Updated: 25 min 52 sec ago

Even animals compose

February 17, 2015 - 10:56am
An international research team lead by Marisa Hoeschele from the University of Vienna argue that only by combining examination of species' natural behaviour and artificially testing species for their potentials the animal foundations for our musical faculty can be discovered. Animal research could be the key to unlocking what features of human music are cultural phenomena, and what features are rooted in our biology. This work is published in the scientific journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

Speech disorders: Crowdsourcing a valid option for gathering speech ratings

February 17, 2015 - 10:41am
Crowdsourcing -- where responses to a task are aggregated across a large number of individuals recruited online -- can be an effective tool for rating sounds in speech disorders research, according to a study.

Scientists 'journey' to the center of the Earth and find...

February 17, 2015 - 10:33am

"Even though the inner core is small-smaller than the moon-it has some really interesting features," said Xiaodong Song, a professor of geology at the University of Illinois whose team has just published its work in the Journal of Geoscience . "It may tell us about how our planet formed, its history, and other dynamic processes of the Earth.

Are astronauts really weightless?

February 17, 2015 - 7:03am
Hey look! It's a montage of adorable astronauts engaging in hilarious space stuff in zero gravity. Look at them throwing bananas, playing Bowie songs, drinking floating juice balls, and generally having a gay old time in the weightlessness of deep space. It's a camera inside a ball of water, you won't believe what happens next! Or whatever it was they told you to get you to click that video.

Even animals compose

February 16, 2015 - 11:00pm
(University of Vienna) Music is found in all human cultures and thus appears to be part of our biology and not simply a cultural phenomenon. One approach to studying the biology of music is to examine other species to see if they share some of the features that make up human musicality.

Tsunami Warning Issued Following Magnitude 6.9 Quake Off Japan Coast

February 16, 2015 - 7:49pm

CBS San Francisco Connect With Us At KPIX 5 PROGRAM GUIDE: KPIX 5 TV Schedule WATCH: A Glimpse Inside The Working KPIX 5 Newsroom Breaking News Send news tips, video & photos, and video to the KPIX 5 [] CONNECT WITH KCBS Welcome to KCBS All News 740AM & 106.9FM on CBSSanFrancisco.com! LISTEN LIVE RIGHT NOW: KCBS Live Audio Stream LIKE KCBS Radio On Facebook: KCBS is the Bay Area's only all news station, serving listeners with [] TOKYO - A strong earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 6.9 was recorded off northeastern Japan on Tuesday, the U.S. Geological Survey said, and the Japan Meteorological Agency issued a tsunami warning.

Virtual-twin plan could support surgery for soldiers

February 16, 2015 - 4:10am
A Saturday story in the MIRROR.CO.UK, the online edition of the Daily Mirror, carried a headline that made readers look once, twice, three times: "'Virtual twins' could save lives as doctors prepare to test technology by CLONING soldiers set to do battle." The story nonetheless made useful reading for practical purposes. The story, along with other reports from news sites, is about a technology approach presented at a scientific meeting event with the entire world listening. Soldiers headed for battle duty could be scanned before deploying and their body twin kept online.

Magnitude 4.6 Earthquake Strikes Along California / Nevada Border Near Death Valley National Park

February 13, 2015 - 10:36pm

CBS San Francisco Connect With Us At KPIX 5 PROGRAM GUIDE: KPIX 5 TV Schedule WATCH: A Glimpse Inside The Working KPIX 5 Newsroom Breaking News Send news tips, video & photos, and video to the KPIX 5 [...] CONNECT WITH KCBS Welcome to KCBS All News 740AM & 106.9FM on CBSSanFrancisco.com! LISTEN LIVE RIGHT NOW: KCBS Live Audio Stream LIKE KCBS Radio On Facebook: KCBS is the Bay Area's only all news station, serving listeners with [...] - The U.S. Geological Survey reported that an earthquake measuring magnitude 4.6 struck along the California / Nevada border near Death Valley National Park Friday evening.

Auditory brainstem implant: Hearing experts break sound barrier for children born without hearing nerve

February 13, 2015 - 1:50pm
Medical researchers are breaking sound barriers for children born without a hearing nerve. Hearing loss manifests in various forms, most of which can be partially restored through hearing aids and cochlear implants. Those devices cannot help a small population of individuals who do not have a cochlear, or hearing, nerve -- these people are unable to perceive sound, no matter how loud, outside of feeling vibration. The ABI is considered revolutionary because it stimulates neurons directly at the human brainstem, bypassing the inner ear entirely.

Industry's largest glass-molded aspheric lens

February 13, 2015 - 8:30am
Panasonic Corporation today announced that it has developed the industry's largest glass-molded aspheric lens measuring 75 mm in diameter that can be used for interchangeable lenses for cameras and projectors whose size and resolution have been increasingly reduced and enhanced, respectively. The shipping of samples of this large-diameter aspheric lens will start from February 13, 2015. We will also commence with external sales of these lenses.

NUS pioneers novel strategy to prevent progression of inflammation-associated cancers

February 12, 2015 - 11:00pm
(National University of Singapore) A team of researchers led by associate professor Caroline Lee from the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore, in collaboration with associate professor Song Jianxing of the Department of Biological Sciences at the National University of Singapore Faculty of Science, has developed a novel strategy in the fight against cancer.

Exclusive: Mac DeMarco performs “Salad Days” with a little help from his friends

February 12, 2015 - 10:00am

With his sunny voice and slightly off-kilter guitaring, gap-toothed Canadian indie-rocker Mac DeMarco might leave you jonesing for summer. So to tide you over ’til warmer times, here he is performing an acoustic version of “Salad Days” at last year’s Pickathon. We’re not quite sure what exactly is tied to the end of his guitar, but we’d listen to that day-dreamy croon any day.

More: Grist presents the Pickathon On the Farm series
More: Woods performs “Ain’t It Easy” — in the woods
More: Mandolin Orange’s intimate “Wake Me” performance


Filed under: Article, Living

Understanding mental health through art curation

February 12, 2015 - 8:27am
Vienna: 'City of Music'; 'City of Dreams'; home, at the turn of the 20th century to some of the most influential composers, artists and thinkers of our time. For Gemma Blackshaw, Associate Professor of Art History, the Austrian capital has proven to be an inspirational focus for more than 15 years' research, during which time she has produced a body of work that has challenged the very self image of the city.

Music Can Heal the Brain

February 12, 2015 - 8:00am
New therapies are using rhythm, beat and melody to help patients recover language, hearing, motion and emotion

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Spontaneous activity shapes neuron development

February 11, 2015 - 11:00pm
(King's College London) A process previously thought to be mere background noise in the brain has been found to shape the growth of neurons as the brain develops, according to research from the Medical Research Council Centre for Developmental Neurobiology Research Council Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, published in Cell Reports.

Terrible at remembering names? Blame it on the music, not the memory

February 11, 2015 - 2:39pm
A study challenged younger and older people to look at faces and names while either listening to non-lyrical music or nothing at all. The college-aged participants had no problems -- the music didn't affect their performance. But the older adults remembered 10 percent fewer names when listening to background music or musical rain (as compared to silence).

Power efficiency in the violin: Key design features boost violins' acoustic power

February 10, 2015 - 8:20pm
Some of the most prized violins in the world were crafted in the Italian workshops of Amati, Stradivari, and Guarneri -- master violinmaking families from the 17th and 18th centuries who produced increasingly powerful instruments in the renaissance and baroque musical eras. These violins, worth millions of dollars today, represent the Cremonese period -- what is now considered the golden age of violinmaking. Now acousticians and fluid dynamicists, along with violinmakers, have analyzed measurements from hundreds of Cremonese-era violins, identifying key design features that contribute to these particular violins' acoustic power, or fullness of sound.

New study identifies key design features that boost violins' acoustic power

February 10, 2015 - 6:00pm
Some of the most prized violins in the world were crafted in the Italian workshops of Amati, Stradivari, and Guarneri—master violinmaking families from the 17th and 18th centuries who produced increasingly powerful instruments in the renaissance and baroque musical eras. These violins, worth millions of dollars today, represent the Cremonese period—what is now considered the golden age of violinmaking.

Stunning Earth Images Tell of Environmental Perils [Video]

February 10, 2015 - 1:38pm
The environmentally minded musicians in Bella Gaia premiere their debut music video, which includes visualizations from NASA, exclusively on Scientific American 

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Optimized application of high intensity focused ultrasound

February 10, 2015 - 8:30am
The field of nonlinear acoustics is currently receiving a lot of attention, thanks to applications focused on the improvement of ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasonic welding, sonochemistry, or thermotherapy. Lithotripsy – the demolition of kidney stones based on the use of high intensity focused ultrasound – represents a further medical field of application.