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A traveling exhibition about the sounds and songs of life

Wild Music in the News

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Game technology teaches mice, men to hear better in noisy environments

June 9, 2014 - 1:34pm
A new type of game has been programmed that trained both mice and humans to enhance their ability to discriminate soft sounds in noisy backgrounds. Their findings suggest new therapeutic options for clinical populations that receive little benefit from conventional sensory rehabilitation strategies.

Research on bird beaks delivers powerful insights on variation

June 9, 2014 - 3:33am
Evolutionary biologists have long held up songbirds, particularly the Galapagos finches first described by Charles Darwin, as an example of natural selection at work. In order to exploit different environments and food sources, the birds developed a startling variety of beak shapes—from short, blunt beaks ideal for cracking seeds and nuts to long, slender beaks designed to sip nectar from flowers. The assumption was that natural selection was the primary, if not the sole, cause for the variation.

Smokers, passive smokers more likely to suffer hearing loss, study shows

June 6, 2014 - 7:15am
Giving up or reducing smoking and avoiding passive exposure to tobacco smoke may reduce your risk of hearing loss, new research shows. Current smokers have a 15.1% higher odds of hearing loss than non-smokers researchers found. Passive smoking also increased the likelihood of hearing loss by 28%.

Newly discovered insect 'Supersonus' hits animal kingdom's highest-pitch love call

June 6, 2014 - 6:04am
(Phys.org) —In the rainforests of South America, scientists have discovered a new genus and three new species of insect with the highest ultrasonic calling songs ever recorded in the animal kingdom.

Newly discovered insect 'Supersonus' hits animal kingdom's highest-pitch love call

June 5, 2014 - 5:09pm
In the rainforests of South America, scientists have discovered a new genus and three new species of insect with the highest ultrasonic calling songs ever recorded in the animal kingdom. The insects have lost the ability of flight due to their reduced wing size, so the adoption of extreme ultrasonic frequencies might play a role in avoiding predators, such as bats.

Novel approach to reactivate latent HIV found

June 5, 2014 - 4:36pm
A new way to make latent HIV reveal itself has been discovered by scientists, which could help overcome one of the biggest obstacles to finding a cure for HIV infection. They discovered that increasing the random activity, or noise, associated with HIV gene expression -- without increasing the average level of gene expression -- can reactivate latent HIV.

Short nanotubes target pancreatic cancer

June 5, 2014 - 1:58pm
Short, customized carbon nanotubes have the potential to deliver drugs to pancreatic cancer cells and destroy them from within, according to researchers. Pristine nanotubes produced through a new process can be modified to carry drugs to tumors through gaps in blood-vessel walls that larger particles cannot fit through. The nanotubes may then target and infiltrate the cancerous cells' nuclei, where the drugs can be released through sonication -- that is, by shaking them.

‘Flying Saucer’ Inflatable Mars Aerobrake – How to Test It | Video

June 5, 2014 - 1:02pm
NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) system will lofted to 120,000 feet, via large scientific balloon. An attached rocket will propel the test article into a test trajectory.

Brain circuit problem likely sets stage for the 'voices' that are symptom of schizophrenia

June 5, 2014 - 12:19pm
Scientists have identified problems in a connection between brain structures that may predispose individuals to hearing the 'voices' that are a common symptom of schizophrenia. Researchers linked the problem to a gene deletion. This leads to changes in brain chemistry that reduce the flow of information between two brain structures involved in processing auditory information.

Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes find novel approach to reactivate latent HIV

June 4, 2014 - 10:00pm
(Gladstone Institutes) A team of scientists at the Gladstone Institutes has identified a new way to make latent HIV reveal itself, which could help overcome one of the biggest obstacles to finding a cure for HIV infection. They discovered that increasing the random activity, or noise, associated with HIV gene expression -- without increasing the average level of gene expression -- can reactivate latent HIV. Their findings were published today in the journal Science.

Hear it. Share it. Facebook goes 'Shazam' with new TV, music feature.

June 4, 2014 - 3:01pm

Remember music-recognition app Shazam? Facebook is following suit with a new optional mobile feature that will listen to whatever music, TV show, or movie that is playing nearby, and share a 30-second clip with your friends.

All-natural mixture yields promising fire retardant

June 4, 2014 - 8:10am
(Phys.org) —What sounds like fixings for a wizard's potion—a dash of clay, a dab of fiber from crab shells, and a dollop of DNA—actually are the ingredients of promising green fire retardants invented by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

Simulation models can prevent sheet failures in automobile alloy materials

June 4, 2014 - 5:10am
As part their ongoing work with Ford Motor Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists from the Applied Computational Mathematics and Engineering (ACME) group in the Computational Sciences & Mathematics Division have developed an integrated manufacturing process simulation framework that enhances their understanding of what occurs as AA6111-T4 aluminum alloy sheets, a quality material primarily used for automotive paneling, undergo shearing or trimming in preparation for the subsequent forming process. Their simulations showed how manufacturing processes influence material failures by providing a more complete picture of tensile failure behaviors of previously trimmed edges. Under various trimming conditions, their framework predicted tensile stretchability decreased with increased trimming clearances-in quantitative agreement with experimental measurements obtained by Ford.

Sound installation turns ecosystem into symphony

June 3, 2014 - 6:00pm
Artists create simulation of forest plot's web of life and turn it into soundscape.

Online pirates thrive on legitimate ad dollars (Update)

June 3, 2014 - 11:40am
Movie and music piracy thrives online in part because crafty website operators receive advertising dollars from major companies like Comcast, Ford and McDonald's.

NASA's 'flying saucer' readies for first test flight

June 3, 2014 - 8:20am
(Phys.org) —It only sounds like science fiction. To test a new technology for landing heavy payloads on Mars, NASA is about to drop a flying-saucer shaped vehicle from a helium balloon high above Earth's surface.

Gravity-defying ultrasonic tweezers could lead to life-changing medical advances

June 3, 2014 - 7:22am
Researchers have developed pioneering ‘tweezers’ that use ultrasound beams to grip and manipulate tiny clusters of cells, which could lead to life-changing medical advances, such as better cartilage implants that reduce the need for knee replacement operations. Using ultrasonic sound fields, cartilage cells taken from a patient’s knee can be levitated for weeks in a nutrient-rich fluid.

NASA 'Flying Saucer' Launch to Test Mars Landing Parachute Tech

June 3, 2014 - 5:05am
NASA hopes to launch its Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator test vehicle Thursday (June 5) from a U.S. Navy facility in Kauai, Hawaii. The balloon-aided liftoff was originally scheduled for June 3, but the weather did not cooperate.

Inflatable Heat Shields Could Drop-Ship Bigger Robots | Video

June 2, 2014 - 11:23am
The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator, or HIAD, is rigorously tested in NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center. This technology is being developed to deliver larger payloads to planets more efficiently.

New digital music store to cater to theater fans

June 2, 2014 - 8:11am
The digital age virtually wiped out specialty theater record stores where show-tune lovers could browse aisles bursting with cast albums and sheet music. Now some entrepreneurs are hoping to bring back such an experience—online, of course.