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Wild Music in the News

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Updated: 26 min 47 sec ago

Voices in people's heads more complex than previously thought

March 10, 2015 - 6:57pm
Voices in people's heads are far more varied and complex than previously thought. One of the largest and most detailed studies to date on the experience of auditory hallucinations, commonly referred to as voice hearing, found that the majority of voice-hearers hear multiple voices with distinct character-like qualities, with many also experiencing physical effects on their bodies. The study also confirmed that both people with and without psychiatric diagnoses hear voices.

Move over Mozart: Study shows cats prefer their own beat

March 10, 2015 - 2:40pm
As more animal shelters, primate centers and zoos start to play music for their charges, it's still not clear whether and how human music affects animals.

Move over Mozart: Study shows cats prefer their own beat

March 10, 2015 - 2:00pm
As more animal shelters, primate centers and zoos start to play music for their charges, it's still not clear whether and how human music affects animals. Now, a study shows that while cats ignore our music, they are highly responsive to "music" written especially for them.

Charged dispute: Kraftwerk sues electric firm for name

March 10, 2015 - 1:29pm
The leader of German electronic music pioneers Kraftwerk has sued a company for dubbing its new electric smartphone charger with the same name as the band.

Magnitude 3.1 Earthquake Shakes San Leandro

March 10, 2015 - 11:47am

CBS San Francisco Connect With Us At KPIX 5 PROGRAM GUIDE: KPIX 5 TV Schedule WATCH: A Glimpse Inside The Working KPIX 5 Newsroom Breaking News Send news tips, video & photos, and video to the KPIX 5 [] CONNECT WITH KCBS Welcome to KCBS All News 740AM & 106.9FM on CBSSanFrancisco.com! LISTEN LIVE RIGHT NOW: KCBS Live Audio Stream LIKE KCBS Radio On Facebook: KCBS is the Bay Area's only all news station, serving listeners with [] NAPA COUNTY - An earthquake registering a preliminary magnitude of 3.1 struck one mile northeast of San Leandro Tuesday morning, according to the U.S. Geological Survey's automated seismograph alert network. The quake struck at about 10:07 a.m. at an estimated depth of 3.1 miles below the earth's surface.

Alarms in cars could cut crash rates

March 10, 2015 - 10:36am
An in-car alarm that sounds when sensors on the vehicle detect an imminent crash could cut crash rates from one in five to one in 10 for drivers over the of 60 suffering tiredness on long journeys, according to a study.

Brightman to perform song in space

March 10, 2015 - 10:28am
Sarah Brightman reveals she has been working with former husband Andrew Lloyd Webber on a song she can perform while aboard the International Space Station.

Alarming old and young drivers

March 10, 2015 - 10:27am
An in-car alarm that sounds when sensors on the vehicle detect an imminent crash could cut crash rates from 1 in 5 to 1 in 10 for drivers over the of 60 suffering tiredness on long journeys, according to a study published in the International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics.

Sarah Brightman working on song to perform from space

March 10, 2015 - 10:24am
LONDON (AP) -- British singer Sarah Brightman says she is working with ex-husband Andrew Lloyd-Webber to create a song she will perform from space when she blasts off to the International Space Station later this year....

Now Hear This! NASA Sounds Available for Download

March 10, 2015 - 9:55am
'Houston, we've had a problem.' That's among the hundred-plus NASA audio files from historic spaceflights, current missions and even sounds of the future, sounds that you can easily download to your phone.

Solving the riddle of neutron stars

March 10, 2015 - 5:52am
It has not yet been possible to measure the gravitational waves predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity. They are so weak that they get lost in the noise of the measurements. But thanks to the latest simulations of the merging of binary neutron star systems, the structure of the sought-after signals is now known. As a team of German and Japanese theoretical astrophysicists reports in the Editor's choice of the current edition of the scientific journal Physical Review D, gravitational waves have a characteristic spectrum that is similar to the spectral lines of atoms.

Orion's launch abort system motor exceeds expectations

March 10, 2015 - 5:50am
Three seconds. That's all it took for the attitude control motor of NASA's Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) to prove that its material can survive not only the intense temperatures, pressures, noise and vibrations experienced during a launch emergency but also 40 percent beyond. The LAS is being designed to bring a crew to safety should there be a problem in the launch pad or during ascent.

Product placement, branding growing in popular music

March 10, 2015 - 5:44am
As branding and advertising creep into almost every facet of life, a new study shows it's now making substantial inroads into popular music. The study examined in detail the yearly top 30 Billboard songs from 1960 to 2013 -- a total of 1,583 -- and found a steep increase in `advertainment' or the use of product placement, branding and name dropping among the most popular music in the United States.

Solving the riddle of neutron stars

March 10, 2015 - 5:41am
It has not yet been possible to measure the gravitational waves predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity. They are so weak that they get lost in the noise of the measurements. But thanks to the latest simulations of the merging of binary neutron star systems, the structure of the sought-after signals is now known. As theoretical astrophysicists report, gravitational waves have a characteristic spectrum that is similar to the spectral lines of atoms.

Cellular scissors chop up HIV virus

March 10, 2015 - 5:38am
Imagine a single drug that could prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, treat patients who have already contracted HIV, and even remove all the dormant copies of the virus from those with the more advanced disease. It sounds like science fiction, but scientists have gotten one step closer to creating such a drug by customizing a powerful defense system used by many bacteria and training this scissor-like machinery to recognize the HIV virus.

Study shows product placement, branding growing in popular music

March 10, 2015 - 4:40am
As branding and advertising creep into almost every facet of life, a new study from the University of Colorado Denver shows it's now making substantial inroads into popular music.

Ethiopia's 'Iron Lion Zion' cats fading fast

March 10, 2015 - 1:56am
Ethiopia's black-maned lions once represented a former emperor, "Lion of Judah" Haile Selassie, and were immortalised in a song by reggae legend Bob Marley. Today, they struggle for survival.

APPLE EVENT LIVE: The watch, a gold MacBook, HBO on iPhone

March 9, 2015 - 11:32am
Make calls, read email, control music, manage Instagram photos, keep up with your workout, pay for groceries, open your hotel room door. CEO Tim Cook says you can do it all from your wrist with Apple Watch—for 18 hours a day. That's how long the battery will last on an average day.

Quantum mechanic frequency filter for atomic clocks

March 9, 2015 - 8:28am
In an atomic clock, electrons jumping from one orbit to another decides the clock's frequency. To get the electrons to jump, researchers shine light on the atoms using stabilized laser light. It is however challenging to get the laser light frequency ultra precise -- there will always be a little 'noise.' Now researchers have developed a method that reduces the noise so that it is up to 100 times quieter.

Quantum mechanic frequency filter for atomic clocks

March 9, 2015 - 6:29am
Atomic clocks are the most accurate clocks in the world. In an atomic clock, electrons jumping from one orbit to another decides the clock's frequency. To get the electrons to jump, researchers shine light on the atoms using stabilised laser light. However, the laser light has to have a very precise frequency to trigger very precise electron jumps. It is however challenging to get the laser light frequency ultra precise – there will always be a little 'noise'. Now researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute have developed a method that reduces the noise so that it is up to 100 times quieter. The results are published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.